NU Water-Related Research in Furnas County

The list below shows water-related research being conducted within your district or that affects your district. They are sorted by water topic, then by primary contact's last name.

Displaying 13 records found for Furnas County


Topic Crop Water Use
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Bernards, Mark
Unit Agronomy and Horticulture
Email mbernards2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-1534
Web Page http://agronomy.unl.edu/bernards
Project Information
Title Water Use of Winter Annual Weeds
Other(s) Suat Irmak, Biological Systems Engineering, sirmak2@unl.edu 
Description

This study examines the water use of winter annual weeds. More winter annual weeds grow now than 20 years ago because of the adoption of reduced tillage systems, where the soil is not disturbed between harvest and planting. Winter annuals typically germinate in the fall, overwinter as small plants, and grow rapidly as temperatures warm in the spring; these weeds are especially well adapted to limited summer rainfall. Common winter annuals in Nebraska are downy brome, henbit, field pennycress, wild mustard, marestail (horseweed), foxtail barley, shepherdspurse, speedwell, and prickly lettuce. This project is investigating whether allowing winter annual weeds to grow too long in the spring depletes the soil of moisture that would benefit the crop later in the summer.

Estimated potential nitrogen immobilization by winter annual weeds may be calculated as:

  • 500 lbs/ac of winter annual biomass growth at planting time (this would be a relatively dense, uniform stand of weeds).
  • As a general statement, nitrogen composes approximately 3% of plant biomass.
  • $0.58/lb of nitrogen fertilizer (based on $950/ton of anhydrous ammonia)

Based on these assumptions, a dense, uniform stand of winter annuals could tie up approximately 15 lb of nitrogen per acre (500 x 0.03), or $8.70 per acre (15 x 0.58) of nitrogen intended for a corn crop.

Estimating the irrigation cost to replace water used by the same 500 lbs/A of winter annual biomass by assuming:

  • 500 lbs/A of winter annual weed biomass at planting time,
  • 800 lbs of water is required to produce 1 lb of winter annual weed biomass.
  • At $2.50 diesel fuel, applying 1 inch of irrigation water per acre would cost $9.66.

The 500 lbs of winter annual biomass would use 400,000 lbs of water per acre (500 x 800), or 47,920 gallons of water (400,000 lb x 0.1198 gal/lb). This equals 1.75 acre inches of soil water (47,920 gal /{27,158 gal/acre in}) used by these weeds. Based on a cost of $9.66 to apply 1 inch of irrigation water, it would cost approximately $17.00 per acre to replenish the water used by winter annual weeds in this scenario.

Project Support n/a
Project Website http://weedscience.unl.edu/
Report
Current Status Completed
Topic Crop Water Use
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name van Donk, Simon
Unit West Central Research and Extension Center
Email svandonk2@unl.edu
Phone 308-696-6709
Web Page http://westcentral.unl.edu/web/westcentral/svandonk
Project Information
Title Determining the effect of the amount and timing of irrigation on corn production, using subsurface drip irrigation (SDI)
Description

It is important to learn how to grow crops with limited amounts of water and to determine crop water use with SDI. In 2007 a field study with corn was initiated that will be continued in 2008 and 2009. The treatments are:

  • Rainfed (no irrigation)
  • 0.50 ET (meet 50% of evapotranspiration requirements) throughout the season
  • 0.75 ET throughout the season
  • 1.00 ET throughout the season
  • no irrigation at first, 1.00 ET during 2 weeks around tasseling, then no more irrigation after that
  • 0.50 ET at first, 1.00 ET during 2 weeks around tasseling, then 0.50 ET after that
  • 0.50 ET at first, 1.00 ET during 3 weeks around tasseling, then 0.50 ET after that
  • 0.50 ET at first, 1.00 ET during 4 weeks around tasseling, then 0.50 ET after that
  • 0.75 ET at first, 1.00 ET during 4 weeks around tasseling, then 0.75 ET after that

Using SDI may not only increase water use efficiency, but also nutrient use efficiency when applying nutrients through the SDI system. This study was conducted at WCREC to assess the effect of different in-season nitrogen (N) application (via SDI) timings on corn production and residual soil nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N). We evaluated the effect of three N application timing methods at two N application rates (UNL recommended rate and the UNL rate minus 20%) on corn grain, biomass yield, and end-of-study distribution of residual soil NO3-N.

In 2006, there were no significant differences in corn grain yields between the two N application rates. In 2007, the grain yield under the UNL recommended N rate was significantly higher (3.0 bu/ac) than under the UNL-minus-20% N rate. In both years, grain yield and biomass production for the N application timing treatments were not significantly different. The lack of response to different N application timing treatments indicates that there is flexibility in N application timing for corn production under SDI. This two-year field study was published in Soil Science.

Impact: This study helps us better understand the most appropriate times to apply N with SDI (underground fertigation). If applied at inappropriate times, nitrates are not used by the crop and may leach into groundwater. If N use is minimized, the producer's cost can be minimized.

Project Support n/a
Project Website
Report SDI_Corn_Yield.pdf
Current Status Completed
Topic Economics
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Schoengold, Karina
Unit Department of Agricultural Economics
Email kschoengold2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-2304
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=731
Project Information
Title Analysis of Potential Groundwater Trading Programs for Nebraska
Description

The goals of a recently funded project to measure the potential benefits of developing a groundwater trading market in Nebraska is discussed in this Cornhusker Economics article. Groundwater is a major component of agricultural water use. In extensive regions of the Western United States, rural agricultural economies rely entirely on groundwater. At the same time as providing water for human needs, groundwater is also an input to streams, wetlands and riparian areas that provide important ecosystem services. Ongoing groundwater pumping will deplete flows in adjacent streams, leading to potential conflict between human and environmental uses of water. In the last decades, many conflicts over transboundary allocations of water, endangered species and instream and riparian habitat have been driven by surface water-groundwater interaction. For example, claims have been filed with the United States Supreme Court over the impacts of groundwater use on flows of transboundary rivers for the Pecos River (Texas vs. New Mexico), the Arkansas River (Kansas vs. Colorado) and the Republican River (Kansas vs. Nebraska and Colorado). Groundwater has typically been viewed as private property, and its use in agriculture is generally neither regulated nor quantified precisely. However, there is growing interest in moving to systems that regulate groundwater use. The ability to trade groundwater allocations is often a part of such conversations.

Project Support National Science Foundation; USDA
Project Website
Report Groundwater_Trading_Nebraska.pdf
Current Status Underway
Topic Economics
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Thompson, Christopher
Unit Agricultural Economics
Email cthompson2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-8602
Web Page http://wateroptimizer.unl.edu
Project Information
Title Water Trading Can Reduce the Cost and Increase the Effectiveness of Groundwater Allocation
Other(s) Raymond Supalla, Agricultural Economics, rsupalla1@unl.edu 
Description This project determined that capping the total amount of water pumped with an allocation, and then permitting allocating rights to be traded, reduces control costs because water can move to where it is most valuable. Irrigators with inefficient irrigation systems or relatively unproductive land sell all or part of their allocation rights to irrigators with more productive operations at a mutually agreed upon price that makes both parties better off with no change in total pumping. Subsequent work suggests that cap and trade markets may be able to increase the effectiveness of a groundwater allocation program as well as reduce costs. Read more about this research in Cornhusker Economics
Project Support U.S. Department of Agriculture Risk Management Agency
Project Website http://wateroptimizer.unl.edu
Report Thompson_Water_Trading.pdf
Current Status Completed
Topic Extension
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Irmak, Suat
Unit Biological Systems Engineering
Email sirmak2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-4865
Web Page http://bse.unl.edu/sirmak2
Project Information
Title South Central Agricultural Laboratory - Crop Water Use Research
Description

The South Central Agricultural Laboratory is a University of Nebraska research farm located about 15 miles east of Hastings immediately south of Highway 6. The primary focus of this farm is the development and refinement of irrigated crop production practices for Nebraska agriculture and beyond. A number of research projects are currently underway on site and in conjunction with producers in the region.

  1. Crop water use efficiency, nitrogen use efficiency, and best irrigation and fertigation management practices for subsurface-irrigated corn and soybeans.
  2. Measurement of soil evaporation under no-till, conventional (disk) till, and ridge till practices for corn using frequency-domain reflectometers under three irrigation frequencies and five irrigation levels for corn.
  3. Development of best deficit irrigation management strategies for soybeans.
  4. Center pivot irrigation engineering and evapotranspiration research: measurement of crop coefficients, evapotranspiration, and yield of corn under deficit irrigation settings.
  5. Measurement of crop water use and crop water use efficiency of eight corn hybrids under full and deficit irrigation and dryland settings.
  6. Measurement of maximum allowable crop water stress that can be imposed on corn, stress versus crop growth-yield- and available soil water relationships.
  7. Crop canopy temperature measurements to quantify crop water stress index for corn and soybeans.
  8. Measurements of hydraulics and uniformity coefficients, crop water use efficiency of a new low pressure irrigation system for soybeans.
  9. Measurement of energy fluxes and crop coefficients using high frequency techniques such as Bowen ratio energy balance system and Eddy covariance system to provide improved evapotranspiration data for corn, soybeans, and natural grassland.
  10. Measurement of non-growing (dormant season) evaporative losses to quantify annual evaporation and other water balance components.
  11. Operational characteristics of atmometers (ETgage) to measure reference evapotranspiration and Watermark granular matrix sensors to monitor soil water status and their practical applications and demonstrations for effective irrigation management.
  12. Rootworm pressure effect on crop water uptake under center pivot irrigation.
  13. On-farm demonstration of limited irrigation strategies for making maximum use of water resources. The project is being conducted in partnership with the NRCS and Nebraska Corn Board in Hordville, Geneva, York, Edgar, Ord, West Point, Schuyler, and Mead in grower fields.
Project Support Varies according to program and project
Project Website http://scal.unl.edu/
Report
Current Status Continuous
Topic Extension
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name van Donk, Simon
Unit West Central Research and Extension Center
Email svandonk2@unl.edu
Phone 308-696-6709
Web Page http://westcentral.unl.edu/web/westcentral/svandonk
Project Information
Title West Central Research and Extension Center - Gudmundsen Sandhills Laboratory
Other(s) Jim Goeke, West Central Research and Extension Center, jgoeke1@unl.edu 
Description

The University of Nebraska West Central Research and Extension Center is a research and extension facility of the University of Nebraska Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources (IANR). It serves as the site for field-based research and extension involving faculty and graduate students in eight IANR departments. West Central consists of approximately 1,800 acres of which 1,100 acres are in pasture with the remaining in dryland and irrigated cropping systems. West Central delivers research-based education and information to citizens throughout the state. Extension specialists and educators are committed to excellence, conducting educational programs customized to meet the needs of Nebraskans. These educational programs, delivered via a variety of methods, are offered through federal, state and county partnership arrangements and provide research-based information and other educational resources to the 20-county West Central district and beyond.

The Gudmundsen Sandhills Laboratory (GSL), a 13,000 acre working ranch in the Nebraska Sandhills, is also part of West Central. GSL is situated over a relatively small portion of the High Plains Aquifer where saturated thickness exceeds 1000 feet. GSL also features a valley with a live stream, a drained valley with wet meadows, an adjacent lake, dry valleys, and many dune types so that literally all the surface and groundwater locales in the Sandhills are represented and available for research. In 2004 a U.S. Climate Reference Network station was established at GSL to provide future long-term observations of temperature and precipitation accurate enough to detect present and future climate change.

Project Support Varies according to program and project - for more information see http://www.westcentral.unl.edu
Project Website http://westcentral.unl.edu/web/gudmundsen/
Report
Current Status Continuous
Topic Hydraulics
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Szilagyi, Joe
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email jszilagyi1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-9667
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=119
Project Information
Title Identifying Cause of Declining Flows in the Republican River
Description

The Republican River, shared by three states, Colorado, Nebraska, and Kansas, has yielded depleted streamflow at the Nebraska-Kansas border for about 20 years when compared to values preceding 1970. Based on model results estimating the average annual water balance of the basin, it is concluded that the observed decline in runoff cannot be explained by changes in climatic variables over the area; rather, it is the result of the combined effects of the following human activities: crop irrigation, change in vegetative cover, water conservation practices, and construction of reservoirs and artificial ponds in the basin. These human-induced changes have one property in common: they all increase the amount of water being evaporated over the basin, thereby reducing the amount of water available to runoff.

More about this research in the Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management

Project Support UNL School of Natural Resources
Project Website n/a
Report
Current Status Completed
Topic Hydrology
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Chen, Xun-Hong
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email xchen2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-0772
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=19
Project Information
Title Groundwater Flow Model for Franklin County
Description

Dr. Chen conducted a pumping test in the alluvial aquifer near Bloomington and streambed tests in the Republican River channel. This data was used to develop a groundwater flow model in Franklin County to simulate the impact of groundwater pumping on stream flow.

Project Support n/a
Project Website
Report
Current Status Completed
Topic Invasive Species
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Lenters, John
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email jlenters2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-9044
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=743
Project Information
Title Seasonal energy and water balance of a (Phragmites australis) dominated wetland in the Republican River basin of south-central Nebraska
Other(s) Erkan Istanbulluoglu, University of Washington, erkani@u.washington.edu; Durelle Scott, Virginia Tech University, dscott@vt.edu; Kyle Herrman, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, kyle.herrman@uwsp.edu; Ayse Kilic, School of Natural Resources, akilic@unl.edu, Dean Eisenhauer, Biological Systems Engineering, deaneisenhauer@unl.edu 
Description

Climate and vegetation strongly influence the water cycle on local to regional scales. A change in the surface energy and water balance, especially in dry climatic regions, can have a significant impact on local water availability and, therefore, water resource management. The purpose of this study is to quantify the energy and water balance of a riparian wetland in a subhumid region of the central US, as well as the role of seasonal climate variability and vegetation phenology. The site is located in the Republican River basin in south-central Nebraska, where decreases in streamflow have been observed in recent decades. In an effort to reduce consumptive water use from evapotranspiration (ET), and thereby reclaim surface water, invasive species such as Phragmites australis have been removed throughout the riparian corridor of the river basin. In this study, we used energy/water balance monitoring stations, a Large Aperture Scintillometer (LAS), and numerous water and soil temperature probes to determine the energy and water balance during the 2009 growing season (April 11-October 3).

More about this research in the Journal of Hydrology

Project Support Nebraska Environmental Trust, University of Nebraska Rural Initiative
Project Website http://www.geosciences.unl.edu/riparian/
Report
Current Status Completed
Pic 1 Project Image
Pic Caption 1 Wetland map showing the land cover classification and locations of the LAS transmitter, LAS receiver and two meteorological stations. 
Topic Production Agriculture
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Supalla, Raymond
Unit Agricultural Economics
Email rsupalla1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-1792
Web Page http://agecon.unl.edu/supalla
Project Information
Title Economic and State Budget Cost of Reducing the Consumptive Use of Irrigation Water in the Platte and the Republican Basins
Other(s) Brian McMullen, Agricultural Economics, bmcmullen2@unl.edu 
Description

The terms of the Cooperative Agreement for the Platte Basin and the Supreme Court settlement decision for the Republican Basin both require that Nebraska reduce its consumptive use of irrigation water. This analysis evaluated the economic and the budgetary costs of meeting these requirements. Both the on-farm and off-farm costs were evaluated for both land retirement and water allocation programs, implemented in several different ways, over three alternative time periods, 10, 25 and 50 years.

The on-farm economic costs were defined as the change in net farm income associated with less irrigation. Off-farm economic costs were defined as the statewide change in household income resulting from changes in irrigation, as the effects ripple through the Nebraska economy. Budgetary costs were defined as the cost to the state budget (taxpayers) of policies which compensate irrigators for reducing consumptive use are implemented. Statewide economic costs were found to be lower for land retirement than for allocation programs, assuming the same total change in consumptive use. Total budgetary costs depended primarily on: where the irrigation reductions occurred (proximity to river); on how long the program was continued (number of years), and on whether irrigation was reduced voluntarily with incentives, or by regulation, or by some combination of regulation and incentives. It was found that policy makers could minimize the cost of reducing consumptive use from irrigation and augmenting stream flow by purchasing rather than leasing irrigation rights, by using a regulatory rather than a willing seller incentive approach, and by reducing irrigation at locations close to the river.

More on this research in a UNL Agricultural Economics working paper

Project Support n/a
Project Website
Report
Current Status Completed
Topic Property Values
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Shultz, Steve
Unit UNO Real Estate Research Center
Email sshultz@mail.unomaha.edu
Phone 402-554-2810
Web Page http://cba.unomaha.edu/dir/HomePageBio.cfm?id=347
Project Information
Title Ongoing UNO/UNL Research on the Determinants of Agricultural Land Values: How Irrigation Contributes to Land Values in Western and Central Nebraska
Other(s) Nick Schmitz, UNO Real Estate Research Center 
Description

Hedonic (mass appraisal) land valuation models were estimated in the Republican and Platte watersheds of Central and Western Nebraska. These models are based on assumption that the buyers and sellers of agricultural land are able to accurately assess the value of irrigation when negotiating sale contract prices, and that irrigation equipment can be distinguished from land and irrigation values. Alternative models were estimated using various combinations of explanatory variables (all measured at the parcel level of analysis). These include: soil productivity measures, topography precipitation, parcel size, cropping patterns, topography, aquifer thickness, well pumping capacity, distances to elevators and towns, and irrigation systems.

The location of all agricultural land sales statewide (2000-2007) and estimated irrigation values in the Platte and Republican Watersheds were identified. Preliminary mass appraisal model results were summarized in tables and the locations of retired irrigation parcels in the Republican Watershed (as part of a 2006 NE DNR and USDA Pilot Program) were identified. The value of irrigated cropland is on average $615/acre (this is the value of irrigated cropland only and does not include the value dryland corners within pivot systems). As well, there are numerous areas and site-specific parcels within the watershed with both lower and higher irrigation values. In fact, we have calculated irrigation values for all of the natural resource districts in the Republican watershed: they range from $488/acre to $948/acre. These estimates are still considered 'preliminary' and may be subject to revision. These irrigation values also do not account for premiums above and beyond marginal market values that farmers and landowners will likely require to willingly participate in future irrigation retirement programs.

More on this research in a journal of the Western Agricultural Economics Association

Project Support U.S. Department of Agriculture Water and Watershed Program
Project Website
Report
Current Status Complete (up to 2007)
Topic Water Quality
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Barrow, Tadd
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email tbarrow2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-7783
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=140
Project Information
Title Community Lake Enhancement And Restoration (CLEAR) Program
Other(s) Paul Brakhage, Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality, Paul.Brakhage@ndeq.state.ne.us; Richard Eades, Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, rick.eades@ngpc.ne.gov 
Description

The Community Lakes Enhancement and Restoration (CLEAR) program was created in 2000 to combine the resources and technical expertise of the University of Nebraska, the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ) and the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission (NGPC). Prior to the CLEAR program, Nebraska communities lacked the technical expertise and background required to effectively secure grant funds for park pond rehabilitation. UNL, working with NDEQ and NGPC, realized that melding three agencies into one team, would allow them to be highly competitive in securing grant funds that could then be passed on to Nebraska communities.

In 2008, the communities of Oxford, Hooper and Big Springs were added to the CLEAR program. Combined, these three communities began water quality projects totaling over $900,000, of which CLEAR provided nearly $765,000. These efforts resulted in an additional 5 restored lake acres with improved recreational opportunities for nearly 1,900 residents of those communities.

The CLEAR team is still in the process of measuring the long-term impact of these projects. Because these are part of the city parks system, the communities have been overwhelmingly supportive of this program and testify that it is a huge step in improving the overall image of their parks.

As a result of CLEAR:

  • many communities have utilized the lake restoration as a unique opportunity to focus on improving the surrounding park system;
  • with assistance from UNL, communities are educating their citizens on water quality issues;
  • these communities have independently funded additions or improvements to hiking trails, arboretums, and general park facilities;
  • lakeside grand opening ceremonies have aided in adult education; and
  • local teachers have developed water quality curricula and utilize the restored lakes as outdoor classrooms.

Since the inception of CLEAR over $4.97 million from the Nebraska Environmental Trust, the Environmental Protection Agency and local community partners such as UNL Extension have gone into projects resulting in improved water quality and increased recreational opportunities for 23 communities across Nebraska. These changes impact the nearly 400,000 residents of those communities.

Project Support Nebraska Environmental Trust, Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality, Environmental Protection Agency, Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, UNL Extension
Project Website
Report CLEAR 3 Final Report.pdf
Current Status Completed
Topic Water Quality
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name van Donk, Simon
Unit West Central Research and Extension Center
Email svandonk2@unl.edu
Phone 308-696-6709
Web Page http://westcentral.unl.edu/web/westcentral/svandonk
Project Information
Title Quantify the extent of vertical hormone movement through vadose zone soils
Description

The extent of exogenous hormone use in beef cattle production, in addition to endogenous hormones, increases the risk of hormone residues entering the environment when manure is applied to soil. This research will provide key information on the environmental fate of hormones commonly found in feedlot cattle manure. This information is critical in developing management practices for concentrated animal feeding operations and farms that will reduce environmental risks associated with land application of manure.

This research will be conducted using the specialized percolation lysimeters research site at the West Central Research and Extension Center during 2008 and 2009. The site contains fourteen percolation lysimeters installed at the center of each of fourteen field plots. Each plot is 40 ft m by 40 ft. Each lysimeter contains an undisturbed soil core with a diameter of 3 ft and a depth of 8 ft and has porous extractors at the bottom, which allows the extraction of leachate from unsaturated soil using a vacuum pump. These lysimeters have been used successfully for several nitrate-leaching experiments. Water samples, which represent the water that is leached from the crop root zone, can be collected at the bottom of these lysimeters and will be used to determine the amounts and types of hormones leaching below the crop root zone. Treatments will consist of treated stockpiled manure, treated compost manure, and a check (no manure application). The manures will be applied to the lysimeters and field areas adjacent to the lysimeters in the spring of 2008 at application rates to satisfy the nitrogen needs of corn based on University of Nebraska recommendations. The check plots will receive commercial nitrogen fertilizer to match the manure N availability. Three treatments and three replications (nine lysimeters in nine plots) will be used for this study.

Wheat will be planted in the lysimeters and adjacent plots during both years. Soil moisture from each plot will be measured weekly at 1 ft depth increments to a depth of 7 ft, using the neutron probe method. Water samples will be collected every three weeks from the lysimeters from April to November in both years. Soil samples will be collected at six depth increments down to a depth of 8 ft, four times between application and October in 2008, and three times from April to August in 2009. To reduce sampling errors created by spatial variability within each plot, five sub-samples will be taken from each depth. The sub-samples will then be mixed to create one composite sample. Background soil profile samples will be taken before the manure is applied. Sampling depths will be increased as needed, based on the confirmed movement of hormones of interest through the soil profile. Soil and leachate samples will only be taken during the periods when the ground is not frozen (April to November), when movement of water is expected.

Project Support n/a
Project Website
Report
Current Status Continuing