NU Water-Related Research in Hamilton County

The list below shows water-related research being conducted within your district or that affects your district. They are sorted by water topic, then by primary contact's last name.

Displaying 16 records found for Hamilton County


Topic Climate
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Irmak, Suat
Unit Biological Systems Engineering
Email sirmak2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-4865
Web Page http://bse.unl.edu/sirmak2
Project Information
Title Dynamics of Climate Change in Central Platte Valley, Nebraska, as Indicated by Agro-meteorological Indices over 116 years (1893-2008): Preliminary Analyses
Other(s) Kabenge, Isa Mutiibwa, Denis 
Description

It has been established with a degree of confidence that the temperature of the earth’s atmosphere has increased by about 0.3 to 0.6 degrees C in the late 19th century (IPCC, 1997). Global warming can have substantial impact on agricultural production, water resources, and their interactions, by influencing microclimatic variables that drive plant physiological functions, such as surface air temperature, solar radiation, humidity, wind speed, rainfall frequency and amount, as well as hydrological balances, including evapotranspiration. Knowledge and analyses of long-term historical trends in agro-meteorological and hydrological parameters can aid in water resources design, planning, and man-agement. Historical trends in these variables can also help to relate agro-ecosystem production to climate change. We assessed the long-term trends in climatic variables. We quantified reference evapo-transpiration from solar and net radiation, vapor pressure deficit, wind speed, relative humidity, and air temperature from 1893 to 2008 using measured and estimated climatic data. Both alfalfa-reference and grass-reference evapotranspiration values were computed on a daily time step. We present historical trends in air temperature, relative humidity, preci-pitation, solar radiation, and evapotranspiration from 116 years of climatic observations and modeling results in the Central Platte Valley, Nebraska.

Conclusions from this project are:

  • Missing long-term climatic variables from 1893 to 1986 were reliably estimated for reference ET calculations.
  • Annual total rainfall amount showed an increasing trend over 116 years.
  • Both grass and alfalfa-reference ET fluctuated from year to year, but slightly decreased over the years.
  • Solar radiation slightly decreased due to increased rainfall/cloud cover.
  • Average vapour pressure deficit (VPD) did not change considerably.
  • Aridity index trend indicates a general tendency for Central City, NE area to shift toward more humid conditions, more so in the last 10 years.
Project Support
Project Website
Report
Current Status Completed
Topic Crop Nutrient Use
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Ferguson, Richard
Unit Agronomy and Horticulture
Email rferguson1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-1144
Web Page http://agronomy.unl.edu/ferguson
Project Information
Title Nutrient Management to Benefit Crops and Protect Water Quality
Other(s) Dean Krull, West Central Research and Extension Center, dkrull1@unl.edu 
Description

Ferguson is doing several projects with sites in Merrick and Hamilton counties focused on managing nitrogen applications to both benefit the crop and protect water quality.

  • The Impact of Controlled Release Urea Formulation on Nitrate Leaching Below the Root Zone of Irrigated Corn - Merrick County. This study is measuring nitrate leaching throughout the growing season on a coarse-textured soil planted to irrigated corn. Treatments include different nitrogen fertilizer sources and rates.
  • Relay Cropping Effects on Nitrate Accumulation in the Root Zone - Merrick County. This study evaluates the cumulative effect of the seed corn/winter wheat/relay-cropped soybean on nitrate accumulation in the root zone over the two year cropping system cycle.
  • In-Season Nitrogen Management Using Active Crop Canopy Sensors - Hamilton and Merrick counties. This series of studies on multiple crops (winter wheat, commercial corn, seed corn) at multiple sites investigates the use of active crop canopy sensors to control nitrogen fertilizer application during the growing season, using the crop to detect soil N supply rather than predicting soil N supply through soil sampling.
  • The Use of Polymers to Inhibit Nitrate Movement Below the Root Zone of Irrigated Corn - Merrick County. This study investigates the potential of various soil-applied polymers to retain nitrate in the root zone, preventing it from leaching into the vadose zone and eventually groundwater.
Project Support Central Platte NRD, Department of Agriculture, Agrium Inc., Georgia-Pacific, Dow AgroSciences, Monsanto Co., Nebraska Corn Board, Nebraska Environmental Trust
Project Website http://soilfertility.unl.edu/index.html
Report
Current Status Underway
Topic Crop Nutrient Use
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Schepers, Jim
Unit Agronomy and Horticulture
Email Jim.Schepers@ARS.USDA.GOV
Phone 402-472-1513
Web Page http://www.agronomy.unl.edu/newfacultystaff/directory/schepers.html
Project Information
Title Managing Nitrogen Fertilizer Applications to Protect Groundwater
Description USDA-ARS scientists have research projects near Shelton, near Giltner, and about seven miles north of Central City which deal with protecting groundwater by carefully managing nitrogen fertilizer applications to corn and wheat. One cropping system involves seed corn production, which is assumed to be environmentally unfriendly. Our strategy is to plant wheat as a scavenger crop after the seed corn is harvested. In early June, soybeans are inter-seeded into the wheat. Both wheat and soybean function as scavenger crops and essentially eliminate the potential for nitrate leaching. A component of this management strategy is to use active (no sunlight required) crop canopy sensors to monitor plant chlorophyll (greenness) and biomass (vigor) while driving through the field to determine if more nitrogen is required by wheat or corn and automatically applying additional fertilizer while at that spot in the field. These technologies allow producers to use the crop as a bio-sensor of nitrogen needs and optimize nitrogen supplied by other sources (soil organic matter, manure, irrigation water).
Project Support U.S. Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service
Project Website http://www.nue.okstate.edu/
Report
Current Status n/a
Topic Extension
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Skipton, Sharon
Unit Southeast Research and Extension Center
Email sskipton1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-3662
Web Page http://www.southeast.unl.edu/staffdir/Skipton_Sharon
Project Information
Title Southeast Research and Extension Center
Other(s) Gary Zoubek, York County Extension, gzoubek@unl.edu 
Description Each day University of Nebraska Extension makes a difference in the lives of adults and youth. The faculty and staff in the Southeast Research and Extension Center and the 28 County Offices work to bring relevant researched based information to people in communities, towns and urban centers. Our efforts rely increasingly on partnerships with government agencies, business, industry, schools and community organizations. Working together with our partners Extension strives to strengthen the social, economic and environmental base of Nebraska's communities. Our programs must be ever-changing as Extension listens and responds to issues as they evolve. The Southeast Research and Extension District is unique because it serves both urban and rural communities Nebraska. The faculty and staff are committed to bringing the resources of the University and its research based information to the individuals and communities of Southeast Nebraska.
Project Support Varies according to program and project - for more information see http://www.southeast.unl.edu/
Project Website http://www.southeast.unl.edu/
Report
Current Status Continuous
Topic Hydrology
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Chen, Xun-Hong
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email xchen2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-0772
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=19
Project Information
Title Investigation of Stream-Aquifer Hydrologic Relationship for Clear Creek in Polk and Butler Counties
Other(s) Weihong Dong, Jilin University; Zhaowei Wang, School of Natural Resources; Gengxin Ou, School of Natural Resources; Can Liu, School of Natural Resources, can.liu1989@huskers.unl.edu 
Description

Vertical hydraulic conductivities (Kv) of both streambed and point bars can influence water and solute exchange between streams and surrounding groundwater systems. The sediments in point bars are relatively young compared to the older sediments in the adjacent aquifers but slightly older compared to submerged streambeds. Thus, the permeability in point bar sediments can be different not only from regional aquifer but also from modern streambed. However, there is a lack of detailed studies that document spatial variability of vertical hydraulic conductivity in point bars of meandering streams. In this study, the authors proposed an in situ permeameter test method to measure vertical hydraulic conductivity of the two point bars in Clear Creek, Nebraska, USA. We compared the Kv values in streambed and adjacent point bars through 45 test locations in the two point bars and 51 test locations in the streambed.

The Kv values in the point bars were lower than those in the streambed. Kruskal–Wallis test confirmed that the Kv values from the point bars and from the channel came from two statistically different populations. Within a point bar, the Kv values were higher along the point bar edges than those from inner point bars. Grain size analysis indicated that slightly more silt and clay particles existed in sediments from inner point bars, compared to that from streambed and from locations near the point bar edges. While point bars are the deposits of the adjacent channel, the comparison of two groups of Kv values suggests that post-depositional processes had an effect on the evolution of Kv from channel to point bars in fluvial deposits.

We believed that the transport of fine particles and the gas ebullition in this gaining stream had significant effects on the distribution of Kv values in a streambed-point bar system. With the ageing of deposition in a floodplain, the permeability of point bar sediments can likely decrease due to reduced effects of the upward flow and gas ebullition.

Project Support Upper Big Blue Natural Resources District, Chinese Ministry of Education, National Natural Science Foundation of China
Project Website
Report Chen_Hydraulic_Conductivity.pdf
Current Status Completed
Pic 1 Project Image
Pic Caption 1 Map showing the study site in Clear Creek, Nebraska 
Pic 2 Project Image 2
Pic Caption 2 Schematic for the in situ permeameter test in the point bars 
Topic Hydrology
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Chen, Xun-Hong
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email xchen2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-0772
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=19
Project Information
Title Hydrologic Connections in the Central Platte River Basin
Other(s) Mark E. Burbach, Conservation and Survey Division, mburbach1@unl.edu; Cheng Cheng, School of Natural Resources, ccheng2@unl.edu 
Description

The hydrologic properties of channel sediments have an important role in controlling hydrologic process in streams. This study focused on the water exchange between a stream and an aquifer induced by groundwater withdrawal, with the purpose of investigating the interbedded feature of channel sediments and to evaluate its effects on the calculation of streamflow depletion. Field work was conducted at nine study sites between Kearney and Columbus during the summers of 2005 and 2006. Direct-push techniques were used to produce electrical conductivity logs and to collect sediment cores. Permeameter tests were conducted on the sediment cores. Stream-aquifer simulation models were used to evaluate streamflow depletion for various types of channel sediments.

Sediment core samples were categorized into four groups:

  • sand and gravel,
  • sand and gravel with interbedded silt and clay layers,
  • fine sand with silt or clay layers, and
  • silt and clay with some sand and gravel.

In general coarse sediments occur in the western part of the study area, and the amount of fine sand, silt and clay increases eastward along the river. However, the sediments in the top two meters are about the same for all the sites, consisting mainly of sand and gravel.

Project Support Central Platte Natural Resources District, Upper Big Blue Natural Resources District, U.S. Geological Survey (through the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Water Center), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Project Website
Report Chen Hydrologic Connections.pdf
Current Status Published in Journal of Hydrology 2008 352:250-266
Topic Hydrology
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Chen, Xun-Hong
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email xchen2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-0772
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=19
Project Information
Title Hydrologic Connections in the Big and Little Blue River Basins
Other(s) Cheng Cheng, School of Natural Resources, ccheng2@unl.edu 
Description Over extraction of groundwater near a stream can lower stream stage and induce streamflow depletion when the stream and aquifer are hydrologically connected. The Little Blue River Basin is an area of intensive groundwater development for irrigation, and the streamflow depletion in this basin was determined by an analog model (Emery, 1966). However, the post audit of the model (Alley and Emery, 1986) suggested that the decline of water-levels was overestimated and streamflow depletion was underestimated. Therefore, it is necessary to re-evaluate stream-aquifer interactions in the basin. In this study, an area is chosen for this analysis from the basin and three main streams -- the Little Blue River, Big Sandy Creek, and Spring Creek are included. Channel sediments and structures play an important role in determining stream-aquifer interactions. Firstly, field and laboratory methods including geoprobe logging and permeameter tests are utilized to investigate the channel deposits in the three main streams in the Little Blue River Basin. Results show that channels have low hydraulic-permeable layers which reduce their hydraulic connections to the adjacent aquifers. Secondly, a groundwater flow model is constructed to identify the hydraulic properties of the aquifer and evaluate streamflow depletion under groundwater withdrawals in the study area. Modeling results indicate that streamflow depletion is very low and aquifer storage loss is the main source of groundwater pumpage.
Project Support Upper Big Blue Natural Resources Distrect, Lower Big Blue Natural Resources District, Little Blue Natural Resources District
Project Website
Report
Current Status Completed
Topic Production Agriculture
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Ferguson, Richard
Unit Agronomy and Horticulture
Email rferguson1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-1144
Web Page http://agronomy.unl.edu/ferguson
Project Information
Title Interactions of Water and Nitrogen Supply for Irrigated Corn across Field Landscapes
Other(s) Tim Shaver, West Central Research & Extension Center, tim.shaver@unl.edu; Nicholas Ward, Agronomy & Horticulture, ward.nick.c@gmail.com; Suat Irmak, Biological Systems Engineering, sirmak2@unl.edu; Simon van Donk, West Central Research & Extension Center, simon.vandonk@unl.edu; Daran Rudnick, Agronomy & Horticulture, daran.rudnick@huskers.unl.edu; Brian Wienhold, Agronomy & Horticulture, bwienhold1@unl.edu 
Description

Water and nitrogen (N) supply to a crop can interact throughout the growing season to influence yield potential. The increasing availability of variable rate irrigation systems to growers in irrigated regions, along with existing capacity for variable rate fertilization, provides the opportunity for temporal and spatial management of inputs of water and nitrogen. This study was initiated in 2011 to explore interactions of landscape and soil features with water and N inputs on grain yield and water and N use efficiency. Five field locations were used across Nebraska to evaluate the effects of landscape variation, climate, and capacity for temporal and spatial management of water and N. Preliminary results in 2011 showed that at sites with significant topographic variation these features influenced grain yield as much as the rate of irrigation water or nitrogen fertilizer, indicating the importance of considering spatial variation in landscape features when optimizing rates and timing of water and nitrogen.

Five field locations were used for the study in 2011. Two sites were at University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) research laboratories the South Central Agricultural Laboratory (SCAL) and the Brule Water Resources Laboratory (BWL). Three sites were located on cooperating producer’s fields one in Morrill County, and two in Hamilton County. The UNL research sites included more detailed measurements, and inclusion of treatments that were more yield-limiting than those on producer fields. Locations were situated across a rainfall and soils gradient in Nebraska, allowing evaluation of site-specific water/N management interactions over a range of annual rainfall and soil types. Three of the sites included the use of variable rate irrigation systems and two of the sites implemented canopy sensor-based in-season N treatments.

Project Support John Deere
Project Website
Report Ferguson_Landscape.pdf
Current Status Completed
Pic 1 Project Image
Pic Caption 1 Study locations in 2011, with precipitation gradient across Nebraska 
Topic Riparian Vegetation Water Use
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Irmak, Suat
Unit Biological Systems Engineering
Email sirmak2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-4865
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=47
Project Information
Title Evapotranspiration crop coefficients for mixed riparian plant community and transpiration crop coefficients for Common reed, Cottonwood and Peach-leaf willow in the Platte River Basin, Nebraska-USA
Other(s) Isa Kabenge, Biological Systems Engineering, ikabenge2@unlnotes.unl.edu; Daran Rudnick, Biological Systems Engineering; Stevan Knezevic, Northeast Research and Extension Center, sknezevic2@unl.edu; Duane Woodward, Central Platte Natural Resource District, woodward@cpnrd.org; Milt Moravek, Central Platte Natural Resource District 
Description

Application of two-step approach of evapotranspiration (ET) crop coefficients (Kc) to approximate a very complex process of actual evapotranspiration (ETa) for field crops has been practiced by water management community. However, the use of Kc, and in particular the concept of growing degree days (GDD) to estimate Kc, have not been sufficiently studied for estimation of evaporative losses from riparian vegetation. Our study is one of the first to develop evapotranspiration crop coefficient (KcET) curves for mixed riparian vegetation and transpiration (TRP) crop coefficients (KcTRP) for individual riparian species as a function GDD through extensive field campaigns conducted in 2009 and 2010 in the Platte River Basin in central Nebraska, USA.

Project Support
Project Website
Report Irmak_Platte_River_ET.pdf
Current Status Completed
Pic 1 Project Image
Pic Caption 1 Location of the Bowen ratio energy balance system (BREBS) at the Common reed-dominated Cottonwood and Peach-leaf willow riparian plant community in the Platte River Basin in central Nebraska, USA. 
Topic Survey
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Joseph Hamm
Unit jhamm2@nebraska.edu
Phone 402-472-5678
Web Page http://ppc.unl.edu/
Project Information
Title Platte River Habitat Partnership Survey
Other(s) Lisa Pytlik Zillig, Public Policy Center, lpytlikz@nebraska.edu, Alan Tomking, Public Policy Center, atomkins@nebraska.edu 
Description

Nebraska’s native prairies are a valued resource and under constant anthropogenic demand and degradation. By engaging land owners in voluntary programs, the Platte River Habitat Partnership aims to restore and enhance this important natural resource. In this project, the Public Policy Center conducted a survey to assess land owners’ perceptions of the Platte River Habitat Partnership to help direct the Partnership’s second phase. Specifically, land owners who live in the region covered by the Partnership but did not participate, and those that did participate in the Partnership were surveyed in order to answer four key questions: 1. How knowledgeable are these land owners about the Partnership? 2. What is the nature of these land owners’ interactions with the Partnership? 3. How is the Partnership itself generally perceived by these land owners? 4. What would encourage land owners who had not participated in the Partnership to participate?

Project Support The Nature Conservancy
Project Website http://ppc.unl.edu/project/PlatteRiverHabitatPartnershipSurvey
Report PRHP_Report.pdf
Current Status Completed
Topic Wastewater
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Woldt, Wayne
Unit Southeast Research and Extension Center
Email wwoldt1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-8656
Web Page http://bse.unl.edu/wwoldt1
Project Information
Title Onsite Wastewater Treatment System Certification Training and Education Project
Other(s) Jan Hyngstrom, Biological Systems Engineering, jhygnstrom1@unl.edu; Sharon Skipton, Southeast Research and Extension Center, sskipton1@unl.edu 
Description

The goal of this project is to enable onsite wastewater treatment system professionals to apply science-based onsite wastewater design, installation, and maintenance practices and thereby protect water resources and human health. As of December 31, 2005, onsite professionals must pass exams to be certified pumpers, installers, and/or inspectors in the state of Nebraska. In-depth curriculum for Nebraska onsite wastewater system installers, inspectors and pumpers was developed to address this issue. The curriculum helps individuals prepare for exams, as well as help professionals apply science-based practices to protect water resources.

During 2005 and 2006, UNL Extension had 733 educational training contacts. Knowledge and competency was demonstrated by 86 percent passing their exam(s). Results from a follow-up survey of 460 of those who had attended training indicated pumpers (90%), installers (99%) and inspectors (100%) increased knowledge. Pumpers (76%), installers (71%), and inspectors (90%) reported they had made practices changes which would result in water quality and human health being better protected.

Certification training continues on an annual basis and new curriculum is being developed for advanced alternative treatment systems. These systems can achieve greater water quality protection in vulnerable areas including those with high groundwater levels and/or sandy soils. Merrick, Hall, and Hamilton Counties have geographic areas of high risk from traditional onsite wastewater treatment systems due to these factors. Alternative systems could greatly reduce the risk of water quality degradation from nitrate and other contaminants in these areas.

Educational materials have also been developed and delivered for homeowners with onsite systems. The goal is to empower rural homeowners to protect water resources and human health through application of science-based onsite system maintenance and operation practices. Training was delivered in Grand Island and to 50 residents with onsite systems at Turtle Beach near Central City.

Project Support Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality, Nebraska Onsite Waste Water Association
Project Website http://water.unl.edu/web/sewage/home
Report
Current Status Continuous
Topic Water Quality
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Dvorak, Bruce
Unit Civil Engineering
Email bdvorak1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-3431
Web Page http://www.engineering.unl.edu/civil/faculty/BruceDvorak.shtml
Project Information
Title Arsenic and Uranium in Drinking Water Training and Education Project
Other(s) Wayne Woldt, Biological Systems Engineering, wwoldt1@unl.edu; Sharon Skipton, Southeast Research and Extension Center, sskipton1@unl.edu; Gina Rust 
Description

When new Environmental Protection Agency Safe Drinking Water Act standards for arsenic and uranium were enacted, 82 Nebraska public water supplies had arsenic concentrations above the maximum level allowed and 20 had uranium above the standard, including public water supplies in Hamilton, Hall, and Merrick counties. Since arsenic and uranium are naturally occurring in rocks and soil, private water supplies in these geographic areas could also be at risk of having elevated concentrations, possibly putting families at risk from chronic exposure.

A UNL Extension team with a drinking water focus developed and delivered training to UNL Extension faculty/staff in targeted areas at high risk for naturally occurring arsenic and/or uranium. Twelve training sessions were delivered in 2005 including training in Merrick and Hall Counties. Thirty-nine extension personnel with a focus or job description other than drinking water were trained, including 3 in Hall County and 3 in Merrick County. Participants increased their knowledge of the topic in order to work better with owners of private drinking-water wells in the high risk areas. Of those returning an evaluation, 92% strongly agreed or agreed their knowledge increased in regard to arsenic and uranium occurrence, risk, testing, and treatment. These faculty and staff have gone on to provide information and education at the local level to private well owners.

Training on arsenic and uranium in drinking water was delivered at the Nebraska Well Drillers Winter Short Course in 2006 and information on arsenic in drinking water was presented in 2007. Nearly 300 water well professionals attended in 2006 and approximately 250 attended in 2007. Seven percent of 2006 participants evaluating the program indicated the arsenic and uranium program was the best topic during the event, and 19% indicated they were interested in learning more about the topic. Participants indicated they would use the information gained to "spread knowledge on arsenic and uranium to pivot system owners," "educate/inform constituents, customers," "expand markets in arsenic and uranium testing," or "provide safer water."

UNL Extension also delivered training on arsenic and uranium in drinking water at a Professionals Seminar in 2006. Thirty-eight professionals attended. Several professionals involved stated that the focused three-hour presentation gave them an excellent overview of the pertinent design issues which communities and engineers should consider when selecting a method of dealing with high arsenic and uranium levels. They especially appreciated the mix of technical presentations with a panel discussion by community members, regulators, and local engineers.

Project Support Well Driller Training - Nebraska Well Drillers Association Professional Seminar - Nebraska Section of the American Water Works Association, Nebraska Health and Human Services System
Project Website
Report
Current Status Completed
Topic Water Quality
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Riens, John
Unit Wisconsin Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Email John_Riens@fws.gov
Phone 541-885-2503
Web Page http://www.fws.gov/
Project Information
Title Macroinvertebrate Response to Buffer Zone Quality in the Rainwater Basin Wetlands of Nebraska
Other(s) W. Wyatt Hoback, Biology UNK, hobackww@unk.edu; Matt Schwarz, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service 
Description

The Rainwater Basin is one of the most endangered wetland ecosystems in North America. This ecosystem is critical to many species including migratory waterfowl. Land use and runnoff from agriculture and cattle confinement operations are likely to be reducing the basin's health and diversity, however little information exists concerning macroinvertebrates. Twenty-two locations were assessed for water quality parameters, vegetation composition, and macroinvertebrates identified to genus. Samples were collected biweekly starting in April through July for three years. Macroinvertebrate diversity was impacted in areas with little buffer although the effects were not pronounced. Institution of a more effective vegetative buffers strip may reverse this trend to improve ecosystem quality and provide for invertebrate resources for migratory birds.

Click here to see a poster about this research

Project Support n/a
Project Website
Report
Current Status Completed
Topic Water Quality
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Tang, Zhenghong
Unit Architecture
Email ztang2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-9281
Web Page http://architecture.unl.edu/people/bios/tang_zhenghong.shtml
Project Information
Title Assessment of Sedimentation and Water Quality Conditions in the Rainwater Basin's Playa Wetlands
Other(s) Mark Kuzila, School of Natural Resources, mkuzila1@unl.edu; Xu Li, Department of Civil Engineering, xuli@unl.edu; Amy Burgin, School of Natural Resources, aburgin2@unl.edu 
Description

The overall goal of this project is to prioritize watershed restoration/acquisition programs in the Rainwater Basin (RWB) by examining playa wetlands’ sedimentation and water quality conditions using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation 2 (RUSLE2) and the fly ash technology.

Three specific tasks are included in this project:

  1. Calculate and map the sedimentation rates and the age of deposition for all playa wetlands in RWB
  2. Consolidate existing water quality data of the RWB playa wetlands and evaluate the key factors influencing playa wetland water quality
  3. Assess the effects of sedimentation control practices and prioritize future watershed restoration/acquisition programs

The final products of this project include:

  1. An atlas of wetland sedimentation maps and a risk report highlighting the areas in watersheds with the highest sedimentation rates
  2. A geodatabase and an evaluation report on the water quality conditions of the playa wetlands in the RWB
  3. A written assessment report for sedimentation control practices and a watershed index to prioritize future conservation/acquisition programs
Project Support U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Project Website http://www.unl.edu/playawetlands/
Report
Current Status Underway
Topic Watershed Management
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Jenkins, Allan
Unit Economics
Email
Phone
Web Page
Project Information
Title Middle Platte Socioeconomic Overview
Description This report was published in February 1999 and designed to provide a common body of knowledge to all groups engaged in decisions regarding the Platte River. Recognizing that different decision-makers have different levels of prior knowledge concerning the Platte River, the author attempted to create a document suitable for a range of audiences that also facilitated discussion.
Project Support U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Project Website http://watercenter.unl.edu/PRS/PlatteRiverReports/The%20Platte%20Watershed%20Program.pdf
Report
Current Status Completed
Topic Wetlands
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Tang, Zhenghong
Unit Architecture
Email ztang2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-9281
Web Page http://architecture.unl.edu/people/bios/tang_zhenghong.shtml
Project Information
Title Developing LiDAR-Derived Wetland Maps To Assess Conservation Design Practices For Playa Wetlands In Rainwater Basin
Other(s) Ed Harvey, School of Natural Resources, feharvey1@unl.edu; Xu Li, Department of Civil Engineering 
Description The overall goal of this project is to provide wetland managers with topographically-correct 3-D wetland maps to prioritize wetland conservation efforts and assess wetland conservation design practices. This project addresses three specific tasks for the playa wetlands: 1) Establish accurate, topographically-correct, 3-D wetland maps to relate weather conditions and wetland functions; 2) Develop a measurable Restorable Wetland Index to prioritize playa wetland and drainages conservation; 3) Assess wetland conservation design practices for watershed-based wetland conservation. This research will use high-resolution Light Detections And Ranging (LiDAR) data to create next-generation wetland maps for playa wetlands. The research provides the missing link in conservation design as these data will provide accurate elevation measures to delineate watershed extent and determine the impact of individual hydrologic modifications. This project will be one of the first to integrate LiDAR data and a hydrologic modifications datasets to find the relations of current weather conditions and wetland functions. This project provides reliable, accurate wetland spatial parameters to prioritize playa wetland conservation and assess the effectiveness of existing wetland conservation design practices. The wetland conservation design tools and protocols will be examined in two pilot counties in Nebraska. The intellectual merit of the research is based on advancing knowledge linkage of wetland mapping technologies and wetland function modifications, and showing how to adapt wetland conservation designs. The outputs from this project provide practical protocols for state/regional/local wetland managers and thus ensure "no net loss" in quality and quantity of wetlands.
Project Support US EPA
Project Website
Report
Current Status Completed