NU Water-Related Research in Nance County

The list below shows water-related research being conducted within your district or that affects your district. They are sorted by water topic, then by primary contact's last name.

Displaying 5 records found for Nance County


Topic Climate
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Irmak, Suat
Unit Biological Systems Engineering
Email sirmak2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-4865
Web Page http://bse.unl.edu/sirmak2
Project Information
Title Dynamics of Climate Change in Central Platte Valley, Nebraska, as Indicated by Agro-meteorological Indices over 116 years (1893-2008): Preliminary Analyses
Other(s) Kabenge, Isa Mutiibwa, Denis 
Description

It has been established with a degree of confidence that the temperature of the earth’s atmosphere has increased by about 0.3 to 0.6 degrees C in the late 19th century (IPCC, 1997). Global warming can have substantial impact on agricultural production, water resources, and their interactions, by influencing microclimatic variables that drive plant physiological functions, such as surface air temperature, solar radiation, humidity, wind speed, rainfall frequency and amount, as well as hydrological balances, including evapotranspiration. Knowledge and analyses of long-term historical trends in agro-meteorological and hydrological parameters can aid in water resources design, planning, and man-agement. Historical trends in these variables can also help to relate agro-ecosystem production to climate change. We assessed the long-term trends in climatic variables. We quantified reference evapo-transpiration from solar and net radiation, vapor pressure deficit, wind speed, relative humidity, and air temperature from 1893 to 2008 using measured and estimated climatic data. Both alfalfa-reference and grass-reference evapotranspiration values were computed on a daily time step. We present historical trends in air temperature, relative humidity, preci-pitation, solar radiation, and evapotranspiration from 116 years of climatic observations and modeling results in the Central Platte Valley, Nebraska.

Conclusions from this project are:

  • Missing long-term climatic variables from 1893 to 1986 were reliably estimated for reference ET calculations.
  • Annual total rainfall amount showed an increasing trend over 116 years.
  • Both grass and alfalfa-reference ET fluctuated from year to year, but slightly decreased over the years.
  • Solar radiation slightly decreased due to increased rainfall/cloud cover.
  • Average vapour pressure deficit (VPD) did not change considerably.
  • Aridity index trend indicates a general tendency for Central City, NE area to shift toward more humid conditions, more so in the last 10 years.
Project Support
Project Website
Report
Current Status Completed
Topic Crop Water Use
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Irmak, Suat
Unit Biological Systems Engineering
Email sirmak2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-4865
Web Page http://bse.unl.edu/sirmak2
Project Information
Title Mapping Spatial Distribution of Evapotranspiration and Other Energy Fluxes for Key Vegetation Surfaces
Other(s) Ayse Irmak, School of Natural Resources, airmak2@unl.edu; Shashi Verma, School of Natural Resources, sverma1@unl.edu; Derrel Martin, Biological Systems Engineering, dmartin2@unl.edu 
Description Efficient use of water resources in semi-arid agro-ecosystems of Nebraska is an important issue because of the rapid depletion of freshwater resources and drought conditions, and degradation of groundwater quality in recent years. Proper planning and management, and related policy decisions of water resources require accurate quantification of evapotranspiration (ET). An extensive field campaign has been initiated with the Central Platte Natural Resources District and UNL in the Central Platte River Valley to measure ET and other surface energy fluxes for various vegetation surfaces. The vegetation surfaces include, center pivot-irrigated grassland, rainfed grassland, rainfed winter wheat, center pivot-irrigated alfalfa, Phragmites australis-dominated cottonwood and willow stand plant community, irrigated maize, irrigated soybeans. A deluxe version of Bowen ratio energy balance systems are being used to measure ET and other surface energy balance components, soil moisture, and plant physiological parameters in each research site.
Project Support Central Platte Natural Resources District
Project Website
Report
Current Status Underway
Topic Extension
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Kranz, Bill
Unit Northeast Research and Extension Center
Email wkranz1@unl.edu
Phone 402-475-3857
Web Page
Project Information
Title Northeast Research and Extension Center - Haskell Agricultural Laboratory
Other(s) Charles Shapiro, Northeast Research and Extension Center, cshapiro1@unl.edu; Dave Shelton, Northeast Research and Extension Center, dshelton2@unl.edu; Sue Lackey, Conservation and Survey, slackey1@unl.edu; Terry Mader, Haskell Ag. Lab, tmader1@unl.edu 
Description

The role of the faculty and staff in this unit is to prevent or solve problems using research based information. Faculty and staff subscribe to the notion that their programs should be high quality, ecologically sound, economically viable, socially responsible and scientifically appropriate. Learning experiences can be customized to meet the needs of a wide range of business, commodity, or governmental organizations based upon the many subject matter disciplines represented. As part of the University of Nebraska, the Northeast Center faculty and staff consider themselves to be the front door to the University in northeast Nebraska. Through well targeted training backgrounds and continuous updating via the internet and other telecommunications technologies, faculty and staff have the most current information available to help their clientele.

The Haskell Ag. Lab is a University of Nebraska research farm located 1.5 miles east of the Dixon County Fairgrounds in Concord. This 320 acre farm was donated to the University of Nebraska by the C.D. Haskell family of Laurel in 1956. A number of demonstrations and projects are going on at the Haskell Ag. Lab, including a riparian buffer strip demonstration and a study to evaluate the effect of irrigation on soybean aphid population dynamics. Other studies focus on:

Subsurface Drip Irrigation: In the spring of 2007 a new subsurface drip irrigation system was installed on a 4 acre portion of the farm with sandy loam soils. The initial objective of the research is to collect field data to document crop water use rates for new corn varieties. Specifically, the work will concentrate on varieties that have different drought resistance ratings to improve the accuracy of the information provided to producers via the High Plains Regional Climate Center. In 2007, two varieties were planted and five irrigation treatments were imposed ranging from dryland to full irrigation. The data will also be used to develop improved local crop production functions for use in the Water Optimizer spreadsheet.

Hormones in Livestock Waste: This project will evaluate the fate of both naturally occurring and synthetic hormones that are associated with solid waste harvested from beef cattle feeding facilities. The research involves: 1) tracking the fate of hormonal compounds from the feedlot into surface run-off that would make its way into a liquid storage lagoon; 2) establishing stockpiled and composted sources of the solid manure removed from the feedlot; and 3) applying stockpiled and composted manure to cropland areas under different tillage systems and native grasses. Once the manure is applied the runoff potential will be evaluated using a rainfall simulator. Research will then focus on whether plants that could be a source of food for wildlife and/or domestic animals take up the hormones. (More information about this project is available; see projects listed under Dan Snow.)

Project Support Varies according to program and project - for more information see http://nerec.unl.edu/ Hormone Project funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Project Website http://nerec.unl.edu/
Report
Current Status Continuous
Topic Hydrology
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Chen, Xun-Hong
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email xchen2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-0772
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=19
Project Information
Title Hydrologic Connections in the Central Platte River Basin
Other(s) Mark E. Burbach, Conservation and Survey Division, mburbach1@unl.edu; Cheng Cheng, School of Natural Resources, ccheng2@unl.edu 
Description

The hydrologic properties of channel sediments have an important role in controlling hydrologic process in streams. This study focused on the water exchange between a stream and an aquifer induced by groundwater withdrawal, with the purpose of investigating the interbedded feature of channel sediments and to evaluate its effects on the calculation of streamflow depletion. Field work was conducted at nine study sites between Kearney and Columbus during the summers of 2005 and 2006. Direct-push techniques were used to produce electrical conductivity logs and to collect sediment cores. Permeameter tests were conducted on the sediment cores. Stream-aquifer simulation models were used to evaluate streamflow depletion for various types of channel sediments.

Sediment core samples were categorized into four groups:

  • sand and gravel,
  • sand and gravel with interbedded silt and clay layers,
  • fine sand with silt or clay layers, and
  • silt and clay with some sand and gravel.

In general coarse sediments occur in the western part of the study area, and the amount of fine sand, silt and clay increases eastward along the river. However, the sediments in the top two meters are about the same for all the sites, consisting mainly of sand and gravel.

Project Support Central Platte Natural Resources District, Upper Big Blue Natural Resources District, U.S. Geological Survey (through the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Water Center), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Project Website
Report Chen Hydrologic Connections.pdf
Current Status Published in Journal of Hydrology 2008 352:250-266
Topic Riparian Vegetation Water Use
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Kilic, Ayse
Unit Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies
Email akilic@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-5351
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=860
Project Information
Title Estimating Riparian Water Use: An Application of Remote Sensing
Description The goal of this project is to quantify riparian evapotranspiration (ET) by utilzing satellite and air-borne remote sensing data on selected watersheds in the North Platte River. The results will be used to develop guidelines on riparian water use.
Project Support UNL Office of Research Layman Award
Project Website
Report
Current Status Completed