NU Water-Related Research in District 42

The list below shows water-related research being conducted within your district or that affects your district. They are sorted by water topic, then by primary contact's last name.

Displaying 26 records found for District 42


Topic Crop Water Use
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Cassman, Ken
Unit Agronomy and Horticulture
Email kcassman1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-5554
Web Page http://agronomy.unl.edu/cassman
Project Information
Title Real-time Decision Support System for Deficit Irrigation - Hybrid-Maize
Other(s)  
Description

Hybrid-Maize is a computer program that simulates the growth of a corn crop under non-limiting or water-limited (rainfed or irrigated) conditions based on daily weather data. Specifically, it allows the user to:

  • assess the overall site yield potential and its variability based on historical weather data
  • evaluate changes in attainable yield using different combinations of planting date, hybrid maturity, and plant density
  • explore options for optimal irrigation management
  • conduct in-season simulations to evaluate actual growth up to the current date based on real-time weather data, and to forecast final yield scenarios based on historical weather data for the remainder of the growing season

Hybrid-Maize does NOT allow assessment of different options for nutrient management nor does it account for yield losses due to weeds, insects, diseases, lodging, and other stresses. Hybrid-Maize has been evaluated primarily in rainfed and irrigated maize systems of the U.S. Corn Belt. Caution should be exercised when applying this model to other environments as this may require changes in some of the default model parameters.

This project will develop a similar tool for irrigation scheduling for Nebraska soybean producers, and a real-time decision support system for deficit irrigation on corn, both based upon the Hybrid-Maize model. These tools will assist producers who have limited irrigation water supplies to optimize irrigation scheduling in real time for maximum yields, in particular during water-short years.

Project Support Nebraska Natural Resources Conservation Service, Nebraska Soybean Board
Project Website http://hybridmaize.unl.edu/
Report
Current Status Continuing - Software Available
Topic Crop Water Use
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Irmak, Suat
Unit Biological Systems Engineering
Email sirmak2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-4865
Web Page http://bse.unl.edu/sirmak2
Project Information
Title A Decision Support Tool to Increase Energy and Crop Water Use Efficiency for Corn and Soybean Production
Description

Energy costs coupled with limitations in water availability are threatening the sustainability of irrigation in the state. Energy costs for irrigation rose almost 100 percent for typical Nebraska irrigators from the spring of 2003 to the summer of 2006 and continue to rise sharply. The rising cost of fuel and the limited availability of water make producing maximum crop yield with minimal input imperative.

Nebraska growers need scientifically based and practical management strategies that can aid them in their decision-making process to enhance crop water-use efficiency and reduce energy use to achieve maximum profitability. Growers are looking for answers on how to make a maximum use of limited irrigation water and how to manage irrigation water to reduce pumping cost.

Crop simulation models with the capability of "real-time" assessment of crop and soil water status and yield prediction based on historical climate data represent a powerful new tool to help improve irrigation decisions and increase water-use efficiency especially for situations where the amount of available water supply is less than the full requirement for maximum crop yield. This project validates and demonstrates a decision-support tool for a real-time irrigation scheduling period, and releases the new tool as a software program for use by crop producers, crop consultants, and industry professionals. This tool will be used to assess energy requirement for different irrigation regimes to aid growers and state and federal agencies to make better-informed management decisions.

Project Support Upper Big Blue Natural Resources District, Gard Fund
Project Website
Report
Current Status Underway
Topic Crop Water Use
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Irmak, Suat
Unit Biological Systems Engineering
Email sirmak2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-4865
Web Page http://bse.unl.edu/sirmak2
Project Information
Title Nebraska Agricultural Water Management Demonstration Network
Other(s) Gary Zoubek, York County Extension, gzoubek@unl.edu 
Description

The Nebraska Agricultural Water Management Demonstration Network (NAWMDN) encourages the adoption of newer technologies that will enable farmers to use water and energy resources associated with irrigated crop production efficiently. NAWMDN launched in 2005 and started with 20 growers from south central Nebraska who joined the Network as collaborators. In 2008 an online tool named ETgage was added to enable participation by growers throughout Nebraska.

The NAWMDN ETgage project is one part of a system for testing cutting-edge technologies and creating a network with growers, UNL Extension, NRDs, NRCS, and crop consultants, and other interested partners, that will enable the adoption of water and energy conservation practices. The simplicity of the use and interpretation of the ETgage data, as well as its economic feasibility, makes it easy for farmers to monitor crop water use for effective irrigation management. In this project ETgages are used to estimate crop water use, and Watermark sensors are used to measure soil moisture to determine irrigation timing and amount. Each year, NAWMDN team members organize educational meetings during the growing season and over the winter to implement the project, teach participants how to use the ETgage and Watermark sensors for irrigation management, review the results, set goals, and obtain grower feedback. This project has been reported at local, regional, and national meetings.

In 2005, there were 18 demonstration sites. Some of the ETgage and Watermark sensors were read by growers and some were read weekly by Network core members. In 2006, the second year of the project, there were more than 50 demonstration sites. In 2007 more than 125 cooperators in nine NRDs and 22 counties were involved. In the fall of 2007, 89 producers involved in the NAWMDN were surveyed; of those 56% responding, the estimated corn water savings varied from 0-7.5" with an average savings of 2.6," while soybeans water savings varied from 0-4.8" with an average of 2.1." Using 2007 diesel prices, this resulted in total energy savings of $2,808,000 and $2,269,800 for corn or soybeans over 117,000 acres.

In 2008 over 300 active participants from 25 counties in 9 of Nebraska's 23 NRDs. An interactive web site was also created to inform growers and other clients about the network and to educate producers and industry professionals about using these two tools along with crop stage of growth information to make irrigation management decisions. This interactive web site has engaged the cooperating producers and enhanced learning. The site consists of a map of Nebraska's 93 counties on which producers can select specific counties to find a Google gps map with ETgauge locations marked. Producers can click on specific sites to see the weekly reference evapoptranspiration (ET) reported by producers. The site also includes information about the NAWMDN and how to use the various tools.

For detailed information, see Nebraska Agricultural Water Management Demonstration Network: Integrating Research and Extension/Outreach.

Project Support Partners include personnel from 19 extension offices, the Little Blue NRD, the Upper Big Blue NRD, Nebraska Association of Resources Districts, Nebraska Natural Resources Conservation Service, South Central Agricultural Laboratory, and the Central Nebraska Public Power and Irrigation District.
Project Website http://water.unl.edu/cropswater/nawmdn
Report
Current Status Continuing
Topic Crop Water Use
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Martin, Derrel
Unit Biological Systems Engineering
Email dmartin1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-1586
Web Page http://bse.unl.edu/dmartin2
Project Information
Title Enhancing Irrigation Management Tools and Developing a Decision System for Managing Limited Irrigation Supplies - Enhancing The Water Optimizer
Other(s) Chris Thompson, Agricultural Economics, cthompson2@unl.edu; Paul Burgener, Panhandle Research and Extension Center, pburgener2@unl.edu; Ray Supalla, Agricultural Economics, rsupalla1@unl.edu; Gary Hergert, Panhandle Research and Extension Center, ghergert1@unl.edu 
Description

The Water Optimizer is a computer model developed in response to several years of drought across the state and to farmers facing water restrictions. The model can be used by producers to evaluate management options when water is limiting due to drought or regulations; it can also be used by water planners or policy makers who wish to estimate the farm-level economic consequences of retiring acres or regulating the water supply. Released by UNL in 2005, the model is available for all counties in Nebraska to evaluate single fields for several crop options. Irrigated crops include: corn, soybeans, sorghum, wheat, alfalfa, edible beans and sunflowers. Dryland crops include: corn, soybeans, sorghum, sunflowers, alfalfa and wheat in continuous, summer fallow and eco-fallow rotations. Producers put information into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet, including soil type and irrigation system options. Irrigation options include center pivot or gravity irrigation systems, well or canal delivery, and systems powered by electricity, diesel or natural gas. After entering this basic information, producers enter their production costs, irrigation costs, crop prices, crop type and available water. After these parameters have been set, the program calculates what crops will be most profitable with the given costs and available water. This gives the producer a "whole farm view" in considering how to manage available water supplies.

While the Water Optimizer is useful, it is limited in that it considers economic choices and consequences one field (well) and one year at a time. Three different departments (Agronomy-Horticulture, Agricultural Economics and Biological Systems Engineering) will combine their expertise to develop information to enhance Water Optimizer by: 1) improving the tool's function for crops grown in the semiarid High Plains, including canola, camelina, chickpeas, dry beans and sunflowers; 2) expanding the tool's geographic coverage area to additional counties in Nebraska including irrigated areas in Colorado and Kansas; 3) developing the capability to evaluate risk-management alternatives on a whole-farm basis as well as field by field; and 4) developing the capability to determine the best strategies for managing multi-year water allocations. The benefits of this project will be to maintain profitability and sustain farming enterprises with a limited irrigation supply. The goal is to conduct educational programming in conjunction with the project to encourage other producers to implement practices and concepts demonstrated in this project. An additional outcome will be transferring this information to other areas of declining ground water or surface water.

The Water Optimizer tool was developed to assist in addressing water shortages created by drought and interstate water rights litigation. The current model released November 2010, supports all 93 Nebraska counties.

Project Support U.S. Department of Agriculture Risk Management Agency
Project Website http://agecon.unl.edu/wateroptimizer
Report
Current Status Underway
Topic Crop Water Use
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name van Donk, Simon
Unit West Central Research and Extension Center
Email svandonk2@unl.edu
Phone 308-696-6709
Web Page http://westcentral.unl.edu/web/westcentral/svandonk
Project Information
Title Determining the effect of the amount and timing of irrigation on corn production, using subsurface drip irrigation (SDI)
Description

It is important to learn how to grow crops with limited amounts of water and to determine crop water use with SDI. In 2007 a field study with corn was initiated that will be continued in 2008 and 2009. The treatments are:

  • Rainfed (no irrigation)
  • 0.50 ET (meet 50% of evapotranspiration requirements) throughout the season
  • 0.75 ET throughout the season
  • 1.00 ET throughout the season
  • no irrigation at first, 1.00 ET during 2 weeks around tasseling, then no more irrigation after that
  • 0.50 ET at first, 1.00 ET during 2 weeks around tasseling, then 0.50 ET after that
  • 0.50 ET at first, 1.00 ET during 3 weeks around tasseling, then 0.50 ET after that
  • 0.50 ET at first, 1.00 ET during 4 weeks around tasseling, then 0.50 ET after that
  • 0.75 ET at first, 1.00 ET during 4 weeks around tasseling, then 0.75 ET after that

Using SDI may not only increase water use efficiency, but also nutrient use efficiency when applying nutrients through the SDI system. This study was conducted at WCREC to assess the effect of different in-season nitrogen (N) application (via SDI) timings on corn production and residual soil nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N). We evaluated the effect of three N application timing methods at two N application rates (UNL recommended rate and the UNL rate minus 20%) on corn grain, biomass yield, and end-of-study distribution of residual soil NO3-N.

In 2006, there were no significant differences in corn grain yields between the two N application rates. In 2007, the grain yield under the UNL recommended N rate was significantly higher (3.0 bu/ac) than under the UNL-minus-20% N rate. In both years, grain yield and biomass production for the N application timing treatments were not significantly different. The lack of response to different N application timing treatments indicates that there is flexibility in N application timing for corn production under SDI. This two-year field study was published in Soil Science.

Impact: This study helps us better understand the most appropriate times to apply N with SDI (underground fertigation). If applied at inappropriate times, nitrates are not used by the crop and may leach into groundwater. If N use is minimized, the producer's cost can be minimized.

Project Support n/a
Project Website
Report SDI_Corn_Yield.pdf
Current Status Completed
Topic Crop Water Use
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name van Donk, Simon
Unit West Central Research and Extension Center
Email svandonk2@unl.edu
Phone 308-696-6709
Web Page http://westcentral.unl.edu/web/westcentral/svandonk
Project Information
Title Effect of Crop Residue on Soil Water Content and Yield of Sprinkler-irrigated Corn
Other(s) Derrel Martin, Biological Systems Engineering, dmartin1@unl.edu; Suat Irmak, Biological Systems Engineering, sirmak2@unl.edu; Steve Melvin, Extension, smelvin1@unl.edu 
Description

The magnitude of soil water savings from reduced tillage with increased crop residue is unclear. This study was initiated in 2007 at North Platte to learn more about the effect of residue on soil water content and crop yield. Preliminary results show that soil water content was not much different under residue-covered soil as compared to bare soil; however, corn yield was significantly greater in the residue covered plots. Other research shows this greater amount of corn usually needs 2-4 inches of water to grow. This amount may be considered the water "savings" due to the residue.

This study will continue and focus on "real world" tillage systems where lower amounts of residue are associated with more tillage. A tillage pass will often result in loss of water by evaporation, since typically it brings moist soil to the soil surface. In addition, long-term no-till would increase infiltration and decrease run-off; reduced overwinter evaporation and increased snow trapping would also contribute to water conservation.

Project Support Anna H. Elliott Fund, administered by the University of Nebraska Foundation
Project Website
Report Crop_Residue_Cover_Effects.pdf
Current Status Completed
Topic Crop Water Use and Water Use Efficiency
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Abunyewa, Akwasi
Unit Agronomy and Horticulture
Email akwasi_abunyewa@yahoo.com
Phone
Web Page
Project Information
Title Skip-Row and Plant Population Effects on Sorghum Grain Yield
Other(s) Richard Ferguson, Agronomy and Horticulture, rferguson@unl.edu; Charles Wortmann. Agronomy and Horticulture, cwortmann2@unl.edu; Drew Lyon, Panhandle Research and Extension Center, dlyon1@unl.edu; Stephen Mason, Agronomy and Horticulture, smason1@unl.edu; Robert Klein, West Central Research and Extension Center, rklein1@unl.edu 
Description This research conducted in Clay, Gosper, Frontier, Hayes, Center, Lincoln, Red Willow, and Cheyenne Counties from 2005 to 2007 evaluated the effect of skip-row configuration and planting population on sorghum grain yield and yield stability in nonirrigated, no-till fields. Results were not consistent or significant across the sites. Skip-row planting is expected to produce higher yields when growing season water is less than 26-27 inches, with conventional planting producing higher yields in wetter areas.
Project Support U.S. Agency for International Development to the International Sorghum and Millet Collaborative Research Support Program, Scholarship Secretariat, Government of Republic of Ghana
Project Website
Report Wortmann_Sorghum.pdf
Current Status Published Agron.J. 2010 102:296-302
Topic Drought
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Knutson, Cody
Unit National Drought Mitigation Center
Email cknutson1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-6718
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=430
Project Information
Title Republican River Basin Water and Drought Portal
Other(s) Mark Svoboda, NDMC, msvoboda2@unl.edu; Donna Woudenberg, NDMC, dwoudenberg2@unl.edu; Jae Ryu, jryu@uidaho.edu 
Description The National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC) is developing a decision-support web portal for the Republican River Basin in Nebraska, Colorado and Kansas, with support from the managers and staff of the Lower, Middle and Upper Republican Natural Resources Districts (NRDs) in Nebraska. Under the terms of the two-year grant, the NDMC will collaborate with the NRDs to identify and compile local drought monitoring and planning information needed by resource managers in the basin, including government agencies, local community planners, and agricultural producers, and package it into a web portal. The portal will eventually be housed on the websites of the NRDs and can serve as a model for developing local applications of the National Integrated Drought Information System.
Project Support National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Sectoral Applications Research Program
Project Website http://www.rrbdp.org
Report
Current Status Underway
Topic Economics
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Schoengold, Karina
Unit Department of Agricultural Economics
Email kschoengold2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-2304
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=731
Project Information
Title Analysis of Potential Groundwater Trading Programs for Nebraska
Description

The goals of a recently funded project to measure the potential benefits of developing a groundwater trading market in Nebraska is discussed in this Cornhusker Economics article. Groundwater is a major component of agricultural water use. In extensive regions of the Western United States, rural agricultural economies rely entirely on groundwater. At the same time as providing water for human needs, groundwater is also an input to streams, wetlands and riparian areas that provide important ecosystem services. Ongoing groundwater pumping will deplete flows in adjacent streams, leading to potential conflict between human and environmental uses of water. In the last decades, many conflicts over transboundary allocations of water, endangered species and instream and riparian habitat have been driven by surface water-groundwater interaction. For example, claims have been filed with the United States Supreme Court over the impacts of groundwater use on flows of transboundary rivers for the Pecos River (Texas vs. New Mexico), the Arkansas River (Kansas vs. Colorado) and the Republican River (Kansas vs. Nebraska and Colorado). Groundwater has typically been viewed as private property, and its use in agriculture is generally neither regulated nor quantified precisely. However, there is growing interest in moving to systems that regulate groundwater use. The ability to trade groundwater allocations is often a part of such conversations.

Project Support National Science Foundation; USDA
Project Website
Report Groundwater_Trading_Nebraska.pdf
Current Status Underway
Topic Extension
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Melvin, Steve
Unit West Central Research and Extension Center
Email smelvin1@unl.edu
Phone 308-367-4424
Web Page http://www.frontier.unl.edu/
Project Information
Title Irrigation Strategies Field Tour Series
Other(s) Bill Kranz, Northeast Research and Extension Center, wkranz1@unl.edu; Charles Shapiro, Northeast Research and Extension Center, cshapiro1@unl.edu; Simon Van Donk, West Central Research and Extension Center, svandonk2@unl.edu; Derrel Martin, Biological Systems Engineering, dmartin1@unl.edu 
Description

The 2009 Irrigation Strategies Field Tour Series will focus on showing farmers and crop consultants management strategies to conserve water.

The tour topics, which vary by location, include: Water Resource Update; Comparing Irrigation Energy Sources: Costs and Emissions Requirements; Monitoring Crop Water Use and Soil Moisture Status - Simple, Durable, Accurate, and Economical Tools; Water Savings with Crop Residue Management; How the Amount of Water and Nitrogen Applied with a Center Pivot Affects Crop Yield; How to Get the Most from Your Nitrogen Dollar; Where Slow Release Nitrogen Fertilization Fits into Corn Production; Variable Rate Irrigation Equipment for Center Pivots; Predicting the Last Irrigation; and How Time of Application and Amount of Water Applied Affects Crop Yield.

In 2008 eleven field demonstrations, with thirteen field tours at the sites, were conducted around the state to teach irrigation options specifically adapted for Nebraska crops, soils, and irrigation issues. No-till water savings were shown at the Curtis site and at the Ainsworth site, and a demonstration showed producers how nitrogen losses due to drainage taking soluble nitrogen below the root zone can be prevented with correct water application.

The farmers participating in 2008 reported managing an average of 1,067 acres of irrigated cropland per farm. The average reported value of the knowledge gained by the producers completing the survey was $22,215 per operation. If this average was extended to all of the 160 producers attending, the value of the education gained would be more than $3.55 million per year. The reported potential water savings of 2.2 acre-inches/acre by the farmers would be a 15-20% savings from the typical irrigation water usage and if extended to the average farm size, would be more than 31,300 acre-feet/year. The other 40 people attending the tours also reported substantial knowledge gains that will help save water and increase returns per acre. Their occupations ranged from crop consultants, agri-business representatives, government agency personnel, etc. The acre influence/manage ranged from none to over 100,000 acres. This variation makes it difficult to determine the impact of their involvement, but it is very significant as well. For example, just the eight people that listed the acres they manage/influence (38,875 acres on average) and the value of the knowledge gained ($18.78/acre on average) would result in over $5.84 million per year.

Nine of the eleven irrigation demonstration sites were in farmer fields in 2008, and two were located on the NCTA farm. The plot locations included sites near Alma, Gothenburg, Axtell, Edison, Loomis, Ainsworth, Imperial, Benkelman, Upland, and Curtis (two sites). Two sites (Curtis and Loomis) had line-source sprinkler systems installed to demonstrate irrigation strategies for corn. All sites had soil-moisture-monitoring equipment and ET gauges installed for use at the field tours and to allow the producers and crop consultants to work with the equipment. The Ainsworth site demonstrated the relationship between varying amounts of nitrogen on irrigated corn. The data generated from the sites will also be used for Extension programs in the future.

Project Support U.S. Department of Interior - Bureau of Reclamation
Project Website http://water.unl.edu/irrigationtournews
Report
Current Status Continuing
Topic Extension
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name van Donk, Simon
Unit West Central Research and Extension Center
Email svandonk2@unl.edu
Phone 308-696-6709
Web Page http://westcentral.unl.edu/web/westcentral/svandonk
Project Information
Title West Central Research and Extension Center - Gudmundsen Sandhills Laboratory
Other(s) Jim Goeke, West Central Research and Extension Center, jgoeke1@unl.edu 
Description

The University of Nebraska West Central Research and Extension Center is a research and extension facility of the University of Nebraska Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources (IANR). It serves as the site for field-based research and extension involving faculty and graduate students in eight IANR departments. West Central consists of approximately 1,800 acres of which 1,100 acres are in pasture with the remaining in dryland and irrigated cropping systems. West Central delivers research-based education and information to citizens throughout the state. Extension specialists and educators are committed to excellence, conducting educational programs customized to meet the needs of Nebraskans. These educational programs, delivered via a variety of methods, are offered through federal, state and county partnership arrangements and provide research-based information and other educational resources to the 20-county West Central district and beyond.

The Gudmundsen Sandhills Laboratory (GSL), a 13,000 acre working ranch in the Nebraska Sandhills, is also part of West Central. GSL is situated over a relatively small portion of the High Plains Aquifer where saturated thickness exceeds 1000 feet. GSL also features a valley with a live stream, a drained valley with wet meadows, an adjacent lake, dry valleys, and many dune types so that literally all the surface and groundwater locales in the Sandhills are represented and available for research. In 2004 a U.S. Climate Reference Network station was established at GSL to provide future long-term observations of temperature and precipitation accurate enough to detect present and future climate change.

Project Support Varies according to program and project - for more information see http://www.westcentral.unl.edu
Project Website http://westcentral.unl.edu/web/gudmundsen/
Report
Current Status Continuous
Topic Hydraulics
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Szilagyi, Joe
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email jszilagyi1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-9667
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=119
Project Information
Title Identifying Cause of Declining Flows in the Republican River
Description

The Republican River, shared by three states, Colorado, Nebraska, and Kansas, has yielded depleted streamflow at the Nebraska-Kansas border for about 20 years when compared to values preceding 1970. Based on model results estimating the average annual water balance of the basin, it is concluded that the observed decline in runoff cannot be explained by changes in climatic variables over the area; rather, it is the result of the combined effects of the following human activities: crop irrigation, change in vegetative cover, water conservation practices, and construction of reservoirs and artificial ponds in the basin. These human-induced changes have one property in common: they all increase the amount of water being evaporated over the basin, thereby reducing the amount of water available to runoff.

More about this research in the Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management

Project Support UNL School of Natural Resources
Project Website n/a
Report
Current Status Completed
Topic Hydrology
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Admiraal, David
Unit Civil Engineering
Email dadmiraal2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-8568
Web Page http://www.engineering.unl.edu/civil/faculty/DavidAdmiraal.shtml
Project Information
Title Flow Measurement of Power Plant Water Sources and Discharge Using Thermal Imaging
Description

Water flow measurements are necessary for a wide variety of environmental and energy related applications, such as thermal cooling water and irrigation flow measurements. Current water velocity and discharge measurement methods are generally costly since specially designed structures, placement of expensive equipment in non-secure locations or deployment of personnel are required. Remote sensing is a potentially viable alternative to collect accurate and reliable data of surface water properties at a relatively low cost; however, accurate methods to remotely measure velocity and discharge currently do not exist.

In order to find a relatively low cost and more effective alternative to current methods, a remote thermal imaging process was developed for this project. The remote system tracked the motion of thermal plumes and temperature variations on the surfaces of water bodies at power generation facilities. The tracked motions of the thermal structures were converted to surface velocity fields and ultimately to flow discharges. This project showed that it is feasible to accurately measure surface velocity in seeded flows, and it appears to be feasible to accurately measure surface velocity in unseeded flows, but a more robust algorithm will be important to reduce the effects of noise. The project research also showed that the coice of image interrogation algorithms and filtering can improve velo The results of this research have been valuable to power generation facilities because they allow the simultaneous measurement of water temperature and flow rates, two parameters that are monitored closely by environmental and regulatory agencies. A portion of this research was done in the Sutherland Reservoir and the Gerald Gentleman Station cooling pond.

Project Support Nebraska Public Power District through the Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research
Project Website http://www.ncesr.unl.edu/grants/energyresearch/7-02-21_9.pdf
Report
Current Status n/a
Topic Hydrology
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Rundquist, Donald
Unit Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies
Email drundquist1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-7536
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=103
Project Information
Title Nebraska Airborne Remote Sensing Program
Other(s) Rick Perk, CHAMP Project Manager, rperk1@unl.edu; Anatoly Gitelson, gitelson@calmit.unl.edu; Sunil Narumalani, sunil@calmit.unl.edu; Merlin Lawson, mlawson@calmit.unl.edu 
Description

CALMIT has joined forces with the UNL Department of Electrical Engineering and the UNO Aviation Institute to develop an aerial remote sensing research platform known as the Nebraska Airborne Remote Sensing Program (NARSP). A specially modified Piper Saratoga aircraft is being used as the base platform for deployment of a number of research grade remote sensing instruments. CALMIT's airborne remote sensing activities are centered around a suite of instruments associated with an AISA Eagle hyperspectral imaging system. This specific program is identified as CALMIT Hyperspectral Aerial Monitoring Program (CHAMP).

This technology has contributed to several projects:

  • To determine the condition and monitor the changing quality of Nebraska's 2500+ lakes and ponds - funded by the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
  • To conduct a retrospective assessment of several different remote sensing platforms, with an emphasis on those remote sensing methods (e.g., airborne, Landsat, MODIS and MERIS) that most likely can be used for monitoring lakes routinely and operationally over a regional spatial extent - in collaboration with the North American Lake Management Society and the Universities of Minnesota and Wisconsin
  • To conduct remote sensing of coral communities.
  • To identify and delineate areas of noxious weeds and invasive species by using satellite imagery, hyperspectral aerial imagery, and GPS technology to aid in inventory surveys and mapping of these areas and assess the effectiveness of ongoing weed management actions.
  • To use airborne and satellite remote sensing systems to investigate and improve approaches to managing wheat streak mosaic (WSM), the most severe disease of winter wheat in the Great Plains.
Project Support Platform Development - National Science Foundation, National Aeronautics and Space Administration; specific project support noted above when possible.
Project Website calmit.unl.edu/champ/index.php
Report
Current Status Continuous
Topic Invasive Species
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Allen, Craig
Unit Nebraska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
Email callen3@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-0229
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=647
Project Information
Title Monitoring, Mapping and Risk Assessment for Non-Indigenous Invasive Species in Nebraska
Other(s) Karie Decker, Nebraska Invasive Species Project Coordinator, invasives@unl.edu 
Description

Biological invasions are a growing threat to both human enterprise and ecological systems. This project provides resources to the public and private sector on: 1) the potential spread and impact of non-indigenous species in Nebraska; 2) actual and potential maps of non-indigenous species range (habitat specific maps at high resolution); 3) information regarding identification and management of potential invaders; 4) centralized information on management and impacts and potential spread of currently established non-indigenous species (a web portal); and 5) outreach within Nebraska to county-level governments and individual stakeholders regarding the management, surveillance and control of non-indigenous species. On February 7-8, 2008 a conference on non-indigenous species impacts, spread and management was held, focusing on state-of-our-knowledge and coordination of disparate management and information-provisioning efforts with a goal towards unification of disparate efforts.

This project is meant to build momentum towards a cohesive non-indigenous species biosecurity and management system in Nebraska that is integrated and relatively seamless across institutional boundaries. Spatially - based risk assessments that focus on non-indigenous invasive species impacts on at - risk native species and communities in Nebraska have been initiated with funding from the U.S. Geological Survey and the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission. The results and predictive models generated by this project will be delivered and made widely available to policy makers, management practitioners and landowners in Nebraska. Additional general information about potential invasive species and their impacts will be made easily accessible. Most of the goals listed above will produce and disseminate products that are dynamic, with interactive elements for the public and managers, including mapping of habitat-specific current and potential distributions of invasive species as well as a portal through which the public can inform the entities responsible for management of invasive species occurrence and spread - and vice versa.

Project Support U.S. Geological Survey, Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, Nebraska Environmental Trust
Project Website http://snr.unl.edu/invasives
Report
Current Status Continuing
Topic Invasive Species
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Narumalani, Sunil
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email snarumalani1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-9842
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=85
Project Information
Title Predicting Potential Occurrence and Spread of Invasive Plant Species along the North Platte River, Nebraska
Other(s) Justin D. Hoffman; Deepak R. Mishra, University of New Orleans, dmishra@uno.edu; Paul Merani; Robert G. Wilson, Panhandle Research and Extension Center, rwilson1@unl.edu 
Description

Riparian habitats are important components of an ecosystem; however, their hydrology combined with anthropogenic effects facilitates the establishment and spread of invasive plant species. Researchers used a maximum-entropy predictive habitat model, MAXENT, to predict the distributions of five invasive plant species (Canada thistle, musk thistle, Russian olive, phragmites, and saltcedar) along the North Platte River in Nebraska. Projections for each species were highly accurate. Researchers studied a 1-mile wide buffer on either side of the North Platte River channel from the Wyoming-Nebraska state line to approximately 3.2 km west of North Platte. Field work was conducted in September 2005, March 2006, and May 2007.

Researchers found different distribution patterns among the species. Russian olive and thistles closely resembled each other in extent and variable contribution. While conducting field work, researchers repeatedly documented thistles below Russian olives or in close proximity. In addition, both species were commonly documented at varying distances from the river. Conversely, researchers found phragmites and saltcedar to have a more restricted potential distribution. Saltcedar was common throughout most of the study area except in the extreme eastern parts. The eastern edge of the study area approaches the distribution limit of saltcedar in Nebraska (Kaul et al. 2006; Wilson and Knezevic 2006). Phragmites was common in the eastern parts of the study area; however, there was low to no probability of phragmites occurrence in the west. Potential suitable habitat diminished just west of Lake MaConaughy, suggesting researchers have identified the western distributional limit of phragmites on the North Platte River and in Nebraska.

Variable contribution among all species was similar, with elevation and distance from river as the two most important variables for all species. The most probable underlying variable explaining the significance of distance from river is soil moisture. In most cases soil moisture will decrease as distance from river increases. Although soil moisture may be more directly responsible for the observed plant distributions, this variable is not easily estimated over large areas, unlike distance from river. There was a large disparity of elevation in the study area. The importance of elevation may be the result of the locations of the survey sites, underlying mechanistic variables, or both. Collection sites occurred at the elevational extremes. For Russian olive, thistle, and saltcedar, the lack of presence data at median elevations most likely caused MAXENT to weight that variable higher than others. The predictive model of phragmites also determined elevation to be the most important variable. Unlike the other species, no phragmites was documented at the western site. It is possible that phragmites can not survive at higher elevations because of colder temperatures found at these sites. However, Saltonstall (2002) found invasive haplotypes of phragmites occurring at high elevations in Wyoming and Utah, which does not support the previous hypothesis. A more likely explanation is that phragmities is in the process of expanding its range westward on the North Platte River and has not had enough time to disperse to the western parts of the river.

The results of this study have management implications for these species along the North Platte River, as well as other river ecosystems. For example, the variables used in this study resulted in excellent predictions of the distributions of invasive plants. As mentioned above, some of these variables (i.e., elevation and distance from river) may have underlying mechanistic factors that are more accurate measures of plant distributions. However, one of the utilities of the current approach is that these variables are easy to access and generate in a geographic information systems environment and useful predictions can be derived, which is not the case for some of their potential underlying factors. Also, predictive modeling shows limited areas of suitable habitat in the western parts of the North Platte River, primarily along the river channel. Researchers suggest that extensive monitoring be conducted in these areas to identify any populations that may occur there. Identification and control of these populations will significantly slow or stop the westward spread of phragmites. Also, any populations of phragmites that occur in the west should be relatively small and isolated making control of these populations more feasible. Similarly, abundances of saltcedar decreased in the eastern parts of the North Platte River. As with phragmites in the west, a control strategy should be used for saltcedar while populations are small and manageable. In addition, both species were found to occur close to the river bed, thus by monitoring the riverbanks and sandbars, the majority of populations could be identified within a very limited search area. Russian olive and thistles occur throughout the study area. Researchers suggest that control of these species should take place in areas with high probability of occurrence to prevent establishment of monotypic stands of each species.

Project Support U.S. Department of Agriculture - Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
Project Website
Report Narumalani_Invasive.pdf
Current Status Published in Invasive Plant Science and Management 2008 1:359-367
Topic Invasive Species
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Narumalani, Sunil
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email snarumalani1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-9842
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=85
Project Information
Title Detecting and Mapping Four Invasive Species along the Floodplain of North Platte River, Nebraska
Other(s) Deepak R. Mishra, University of New Orleans, dmishra@uno.edu; Robert G. Wilson, Panhandle Research and Extension Center, rwilson1@unl.edu; Patrick Reece, Panhandle Research and Extension Center, preece1@unl.edu; Ann Kohler 
Description

This research focused on the dominant invasive plant species in Nebraska, including saltcedar, Russian olive, Canada thistle, and musk thistle. Once established, these invasive species can have several harmful effects, such as increasing (1) soil salinity, which reduces productivity of native plants and results in the loss of natural habitat (Pimentel et al. 2000); (2) soil water consumption to such an extent that it can dry up streams and reduce water levels of rivers and lakes (Friederici 1995); (3) risk of wildfires during summer (Brooks et al. 2004); and (4) chances of flooding during high-intensity rainfall by impeding stream flow (Zavaleta 2000).

The study area was a corridor approximately 1.6 km wide and 257 km long located along the North Platte River starting at the Wyoming/Nebraska border and ending at Kingsley Dam on Lake McConaughy. The elevation ranges from 1,244 m above sea level at the Wyoming/Nebraska state line to 943 m, in an area below Kingsley Dam. The Platte River is generally considered to be a braided river with a network of small channels separated by large and small islands and sandbars. It has been noted that historically the banks of the Platte River were rarely covered with trees but instead with grasses and sedges (Farrar 1983; Kuzelka et al. 1993). Some of the islands were wooded, and willows (Salix exigua) and cottonwood (Populus deltoids) trees were observed. In the 1930s, Russian olive was introduced into the region for conservation plantings. It has rapidly spread along the Platte River, replacing willows and cottonwoods. More recently, saltcedar has also invaded the study area from the west and, along with Russian olive, occupies riverbanks, sandbars, and islands. Saltcedar seedlings are tolerant of shade and thrive in a variety of soil and moisture conditions, but especially saline soils.

When examined from a comprehensive perspective for the entire study area (22 flight lines) from the Nebraska/Wyoming Border to Kingsley Dam, invasive plants covered an area of 139,632 ha, of which 1,965 hectares (2% of the total area) were identified as saltcedar and 1,478 hectares (1.1% of the total area) as Russian olive. The three mixed classes occupied approximately 5% of the total area. These numbers indicate the severity of invasion of nonnative species along the North Platte River. Nonnative species such as saltcedar have been known to consume large quantities of water, and because western Nebraska is frequently affected by drought, mapping and monitoring their spread along the river corridor can aid in the implementation of biological, mechanical, chemical, or some combination of these control mechanisms to minimize the effects on water resources.

Effective control and management of an invasive species begins with its detection and inventory. The ability to detect invasive plants with the use of remotely sensed data has improved with new sensors, enhanced technology (e.g., hyperspectral), and innovative image processing techniques. However, datasets that have the highest likelihood of detecting invasive plants come with high fiscal and technical considerations. When compared with low-resolution multispectral data, airborne hyperspectral data is most appropriate for detecting subtle changes in the reflectance properties of various vegetation species present in the landscape (Narumalani et al. 2006).

Project Support n/a
Project Website http://snr.unl.edu/invasives/file/northplatte_sunil_deepak.ppt
Report Narumalani_Platte.pdf
Current Status Published in Weed Technology 2009 23:99-107
Topic Property Values
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Shultz, Steve
Unit UNO Real Estate Research Center
Email sshultz@mail.unomaha.edu
Phone 402-554-2810
Web Page http://cba.unomaha.edu/dir/HomePageBio.cfm?id=347
Project Information
Title Ongoing UNO/UNL Research on the Determinants of Agricultural Land Values: How Irrigation Contributes to Land Values in Western and Central Nebraska
Other(s) Nick Schmitz, UNO Real Estate Research Center 
Description

Hedonic (mass appraisal) land valuation models were estimated in the Republican and Platte watersheds of Central and Western Nebraska. These models are based on assumption that the buyers and sellers of agricultural land are able to accurately assess the value of irrigation when negotiating sale contract prices, and that irrigation equipment can be distinguished from land and irrigation values. Alternative models were estimated using various combinations of explanatory variables (all measured at the parcel level of analysis). These include: soil productivity measures, topography precipitation, parcel size, cropping patterns, topography, aquifer thickness, well pumping capacity, distances to elevators and towns, and irrigation systems.

The location of all agricultural land sales statewide (2000-2007) and estimated irrigation values in the Platte and Republican Watersheds were identified. Preliminary mass appraisal model results were summarized in tables and the locations of retired irrigation parcels in the Republican Watershed (as part of a 2006 NE DNR and USDA Pilot Program) were identified. The value of irrigated cropland is on average $615/acre (this is the value of irrigated cropland only and does not include the value dryland corners within pivot systems). As well, there are numerous areas and site-specific parcels within the watershed with both lower and higher irrigation values. In fact, we have calculated irrigation values for all of the natural resource districts in the Republican watershed: they range from $488/acre to $948/acre. These estimates are still considered 'preliminary' and may be subject to revision. These irrigation values also do not account for premiums above and beyond marginal market values that farmers and landowners will likely require to willingly participate in future irrigation retirement programs.

More on this research in a journal of the Western Agricultural Economics Association

Project Support U.S. Department of Agriculture Water and Watershed Program
Project Website
Report
Current Status Complete (up to 2007)
Topic Riparian Vegetation Water Use
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Kilic, Ayse
Unit Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies
Email akilic@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-5351
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=860
Project Information
Title Estimating Riparian Water Use: An Application of Remote Sensing
Description The goal of this project is to quantify riparian evapotranspiration (ET) by utilzing satellite and air-borne remote sensing data on selected watersheds in the North Platte River. The results will be used to develop guidelines on riparian water use.
Project Support UNL Office of Research Layman Award
Project Website
Report
Current Status Completed
Topic Sandhills Studies and Modeling
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Hu, Qi (Steve)
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email qhu2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-6642
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=54
Project Information
Title The Missing Term in Surface Water Balance in the Great Plains
Other(s) Jinsheng You, School of Natural Resources, jyou2@unl.edu 
Description

It has been recognized that the surface water budget derived from the NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis and other existing climatic datasets is not in balance in the Great Plains region. This imbalance is shown by large surface evaporation which cannot be supported by source terms in the budget equation. This large surface evaporation is always appearing in calculations from the surface and soil moisture conditions specified in those datasets. This imbalance poses serious uncertainties to diagnostic and modeling studies of energy and carbon balances and to our understanding of atmospheric/climatic processes in this region. An effort aiming at identifying sources causing the water budget imbalance has been underway and some preliminary results have been obtained. A main source of the imbalance arises from the calculation of the surface evaporation. It was found that the surface and soil water specified in those datasets (developed from integrations of both observations and model simulations) is biased because of inaccurate descriptions of the soil properties, particularly the sandy soils in the Nebraska Sand Hills. A revised model with more accurate descriptions of the soils and soil hydrology in the Sand Hills has produced a balance surface water budget in the Sand Hills.

Project presentation at the 2008 Water Colloquium

Project Support Department of Commerce - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Project Website
Report
Current Status
Topic Sandhills Studies and Modeling
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Hubbard, Kenneth
Unit High Plains Regional Climate Center
Email khubbard1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-8294
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=55
Project Information
Title Assessment of Soil Moisture Dynamics of the Nebraska Sandhills Using Long-Term Measurements and a Hydrology Model
Other(s) Venkataramana Sridhar; David Wedin, School of Natural Resources, dwedin1@unl.edu 
Description Soil moisture, evapotranspiration, and other major water balance components were investigated for six Nebraska Sandhills locations during a 6 year period (1998-2004) using a hydrological model. Annual precipitation in the study period ranged from 330 to 580 mm. Soil moisture was measured continuously at 10, 25, 50, and 100 cm depth at each site. Model estimates of surface (0-30 cm), subsurface (30-91 cm), and root zone (0-122 cm) soil moisture were generally well correlated with observed soil moisture. The correlations were poorest for the surface layer, where soil moisture values fluctuated sharply, and best for the root zone as a whole. Modeled annual estimates of evapotranspiration and drainage beneath the rooting zone showed large differences between sites and between years. Despite the Sandhills' relatively homogeneous vegetation and soils, the high spatiotemporal variability of major water balance components suggest an active interaction among various hydrological processes in response to precipitation in this semiarid region.
Project Support National Science Foundation, High Plains Regional Climate Center
Project Website
Report Hubbard06.pdf
Current Status Published in Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, September/October 2006, 463-473
Topic Sandhills Studies and Modeling
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Loope, David
Unit Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
Email dloope1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-2647
Web Page http://eas.unl.edu/people/faculty_page.php?lastname=Loope&firstname=David&type=REG
Project Information
Title Large Wind Shift on the Great Plains During the Medieval Warm Period
Other(s) Venkataramana Sridhar; James Swinehart, School of Natural Resources, jswinehart1@unl.edu; Joseph Mason, University of Wisconsin, Madison, mason@geography.wisc.edu; Robert Oglesby, School of Natural Resources, roglesby2@unl.edu; Clinton Rowe, Geosciences, crowe1@unl.edu 
Description Spring-Summer winds from the south move moist air from the Gulf of Mexico to the Great Plains. Growing season rainfall sustains prairie grasses that keep large dunes in the Nebraska Sandhills immobile. Longitudinal dunes built during the Medieval Warm Period (800-100 yBP) record the last major period of sand mobility. These dunes are oriented NW-SE and are composed of cross-strata with bi-polar dip directions. The trend and structure of these dunes directly record a prolonged drought that was initiated and sustained by a historically unprecedented shift of Spring-Summer atmospheric circulation over the Plains: southerly flow of moist air was replaced by dry southwesterly flow.
Project Support National Science Foundation
Project Website
Report Loope Wind Shift.pdf
Current Status Published in Science November 2007 318:1284-1286
Topic Water Quality
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name van Donk, Simon
Unit West Central Research and Extension Center
Email svandonk2@unl.edu
Phone 308-696-6709
Web Page http://westcentral.unl.edu/web/westcentral/svandonk
Project Information
Title Quantify the extent of vertical hormone movement through vadose zone soils
Description

The extent of exogenous hormone use in beef cattle production, in addition to endogenous hormones, increases the risk of hormone residues entering the environment when manure is applied to soil. This research will provide key information on the environmental fate of hormones commonly found in feedlot cattle manure. This information is critical in developing management practices for concentrated animal feeding operations and farms that will reduce environmental risks associated with land application of manure.

This research will be conducted using the specialized percolation lysimeters research site at the West Central Research and Extension Center during 2008 and 2009. The site contains fourteen percolation lysimeters installed at the center of each of fourteen field plots. Each plot is 40 ft m by 40 ft. Each lysimeter contains an undisturbed soil core with a diameter of 3 ft and a depth of 8 ft and has porous extractors at the bottom, which allows the extraction of leachate from unsaturated soil using a vacuum pump. These lysimeters have been used successfully for several nitrate-leaching experiments. Water samples, which represent the water that is leached from the crop root zone, can be collected at the bottom of these lysimeters and will be used to determine the amounts and types of hormones leaching below the crop root zone. Treatments will consist of treated stockpiled manure, treated compost manure, and a check (no manure application). The manures will be applied to the lysimeters and field areas adjacent to the lysimeters in the spring of 2008 at application rates to satisfy the nitrogen needs of corn based on University of Nebraska recommendations. The check plots will receive commercial nitrogen fertilizer to match the manure N availability. Three treatments and three replications (nine lysimeters in nine plots) will be used for this study.

Wheat will be planted in the lysimeters and adjacent plots during both years. Soil moisture from each plot will be measured weekly at 1 ft depth increments to a depth of 7 ft, using the neutron probe method. Water samples will be collected every three weeks from the lysimeters from April to November in both years. Soil samples will be collected at six depth increments down to a depth of 8 ft, four times between application and October in 2008, and three times from April to August in 2009. To reduce sampling errors created by spatial variability within each plot, five sub-samples will be taken from each depth. The sub-samples will then be mixed to create one composite sample. Background soil profile samples will be taken before the manure is applied. Sampling depths will be increased as needed, based on the confirmed movement of hormones of interest through the soil profile. Soil and leachate samples will only be taken during the periods when the ground is not frozen (April to November), when movement of water is expected.

Project Support n/a
Project Website
Report
Current Status Continuing
Topic Watershed Management
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Jenkins, Allan
Unit Economics
Email
Phone
Web Page
Project Information
Title Middle Platte Socioeconomic Overview
Description This report was published in February 1999 and designed to provide a common body of knowledge to all groups engaged in decisions regarding the Platte River. Recognizing that different decision-makers have different levels of prior knowledge concerning the Platte River, the author attempted to create a document suitable for a range of audiences that also facilitated discussion.
Project Support U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Project Website http://watercenter.unl.edu/PRS/PlatteRiverReports/The%20Platte%20Watershed%20Program.pdf
Report
Current Status Completed
Topic Wildlife
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Pope, Kevin
Unit Nebraska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
Email kpope2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-7028
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=759
Project Information
Title Population Assessment of Channel Catfish in Nebraska
Other(s) Lindsey Chizinski, Graduate Assistant 
Description

Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) is an important sport fish, particularly in the Great Plains. In Nebraska, a majority of anglers target channel catfish, and fishing activities are a vital part of the state’s economy. Lentic water bodies provide the primary fishing opportunity for catfish anglers in Nebraska. Despite the popularity and economic importance of channel catfish, little is known of its population dynamics or habitat requirements, and existing studies often profile river populations.

Current standards for sampling channel catfish in lentic systems often yield inadequate catch to assess populations. The objective of this study was to utilize a recently developed sampling method, tandem-set hoop nets, to collect channel catfish in sufficient quantities to describe the effects of stocking and habitat variability on populations in lentic ecosystems. Three lentic ecosystems common to the Great Plains were considered: sand pits, flood-control reservoirs, and irrigation/power-generation reservoirs.

The influence of stocking on abundance and condition of channel catfish varied with ecosystem type. In sand pits, stocking negatively influenced fish condition, and only stocking on an annual basis positively influenced abundance. In flood-control reservoirs, stocking did not influence fish condition, but was associated with greater abundance. In irrigation/power-generation reservoirs, stocking did not influence fish condition or abundance. Additionally, there was evidence that mortality and growth rates varied with ecosystem type. In general, channel catfish from irrigation/power-generation reservoirs were predicted to experience slower growth and lower mortality, whereas channel catfish from sand pits were predicted to experience the fastest growth and highest mortality.

Catch rates of channel catfish were substantially less in this study compared to previous records of tandem-set hoop net surveys, but hoop nets were more efficient than the current standard gear, experimental gill nets, at capturing channel catfish. That is, 100 channel catfish could be captured with fewer sets of hoop nets than gill nets. However, catch rates and size structure of channel catfish in tandem-set hoop nets varied within the sampling season and between years. Furthermore, length-frequency distributions of channel catfish were dissimilar between hoop nets and gill nets.

Click here to read Lindsey Chizinski's Master's Thesis on Channel Catfish Population in Nebraska

Project Support Nebraska Game and Parks Commission
Project Website http://snr.unl.edu/necoopunit/research.main.html#channel_catfish
Report
Current Status Completed
Topic Wildlife
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Young, Chelsey
Unit Biology, UNK
Email youngca2@unk.edu
Phone 507-469-8284
Web Page
Project Information
Title A range-wide assessment of plains topminnow (Fundulus sciadicus) distribution and potential threats
Other(s) W. Wyatt Hoback, Biology UNK, hobackww@unk.edu; Keith Koupal, Biology UNK; Justin Haas 
Description The plains topminnow, Fundulus sciadicus, was once distributed from the Mississippi River to the Rocky Mountains, north to South Dakota and as far south as Oklahoma. Two centers of distribution are recognized. One is centered in Nebraska and the second is centered in Missouri. The geographic range of plains topminnow has decreased in the past decades. Plains topminnow are now considered a species of special concern in the state of Nebraska and listed as a Tier 1 species in the Nebraska Natural Legacy Project. Elimination of plains topminnow populations has been associated with introduction of invasive species, as well as loss of backwater habitats due to drought and lowered water tables. The objective of this project is to provide an updated assessment of plains topminnow distribution and population status as compared to all available historical records. Between 2004 and the present, sampling of plains topminnow revealed that in Nebraska 77% of historic Nebraska sites no longer contain plains topminnow populations. The sampling of remaining historic sites in Nebraska and neighboring states will continue in the 2009 sampling season.
Project Support n/a
Project Website
Report topminnow_range_reduction.pdf
Current Status Completed