NU Water-Related Research in the Lewis and Clark NRD

The list below shows water-related research being conducted within your NRD or that affects your NRD. They are sorted by water topic, then by primary contact's last name.

Displaying 15 records found for Lewis and Clark NRD


Topic Crop Nutrient Use
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Wortmann, Charles
Unit Agronomy and Horticulture
Email cwortmann2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-2909
Web Page http://agronomy.unl.edu/wortmann
Project Information
Title Nitrogen Use Efficiency of Irrigated Corn for Three Cropping Systems in Nebraska
Other(s) Charles Shapiro, Agronomy & Horticulture, cshapiro@unl.edu; Richard Ferguson, Agronomy & Horticulture, rferguson1@unl.edu; Gary Hergert, Panhandle Research & Extension Center, ghergert1@unl.edu 
Description

Overview Nitrogen fertilizer will continue to be indispensible for meeting global food, feed, and fiber needs. Voroneyand Derry (2008) estimated that 340 million Mg yr-1 N is fixed by natural means, including lightning and biological N fixation, and 105 million Mg yr-1 is fixed by human activities, including burning of fossil fuels and N fertilizer production, with N fixation by human activities expected to continue to increase. Townsend and Howarth (2010) estimated the amount of N fixed by human activities to be about 180 million Mg yr-1, with most used as mineral fertilizer. Fertilizer N production has important environmental implications with an average of ~2.55 kg CO2 emitted per kg fertilizer N fixed and transported (Liska et al., 2009). Th e amount of N applied is associated with emission of N2O (IPCC–OECD, 1997) and N accumulation in sensitive aquatic, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems (Groffman, 2008; Malakoff , 1998). Th e challenge is to produce more grain to meet growing global needs with high NUE.

Conclusions Across diverse production environments, high corn yields can be achieved with efficient use of soil and applied N and without high risk of NO3 -N leaching to groundwater. With excellent farm management, recovery of applied fertilizer-N in high-yielding corn fields of Nebraska was well above 60 to 70% at the economically optimal nitrogen rate (EONR), resulting in low residual soil nitrate nitrogen (RSN) levels. Agronomic efficiency and crop partial factor productivity (PFP), the Nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) components most closely related to profitability of production, can also be high at EONR. Less preplant and more in-season N application may be especially important for drybean (CD) which had low recovery efficiency (RE) and much postharvest RSN compared with corn (CC) and soybean (CS). The levels of NUE achieved in our study for CC and CS far exceed current national or regional means, demonstrating the potential for high NUE with high yield corn production. Further NUE efficiency may be gained through more accurate in-season N application such as with use of the presidedress NO3 test (Andraski and Bundy, 2002) and spatial variation in N rate in response to variation in crop need, such as through use of reflectance sensors (Scharf and Lory, 2009; Barker and Sawyer, 2010; Roberts et al., 2010).

Project Support Nebraska State Legislature, Nebraska Agricultural Business Association
Project Website
Report Wortmann_NUE.pdf
Current Status Completed
Topic Crop Water Use
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Kranz, Bill
Unit Northeast Research and Extension Center
Email wkranz1@unl.edu
Phone 402-475-3857
Web Page http://bse.unl.edu/web/bse/wkranz1
Project Information
Title Irrigation Management for Improved Water and Chemical Utilization
Other(s) on field research study on the environmental fate of artificial growth promotents - Daniel D. Snow, School of Natural Resources, dsnow1@unl.edu; Charles Shapiro, Northeast Research and Extension Center, cshapiro1@unl.edu; Terry Mader, Northeast Research and Extension Center, tmader1@unl.edu; Dave Shelton, Northeast Research and Extension Center, dshelton2@unl.edu; Simon Van Donk, West Central Research and Extension Center, svandonk2@unl.edu; Tian Zhang, Civil Engineering, tzhang@unlnotes.unl.edu 
Description

Current Nebraska crop water use rates are based upon field data collected over 20 years ago. Since corn genetics have changed drastically during the past 20 years, this project seeks to provide irrigators in northeast Nebraska with crop water use rates for a range in corn genetics and plant populations. More specifically, this project will determine crop water use rates for corn hybrids developed for maximum yield under high stress and maximum yield under fully irrigated conditions, thus helping to define the impact of reduced irrigation on corn water use rates and grain yield. This project also seeks to use long term modeling of nitrate leaching losses to identify the msot environmentally sound swine manure application strategy. This research will be conducted at the Haskell Ag. Lab. So far a new subsurface drip irrigation system has been installed and equipped with soil water monitoring equipment. Water applications will be based upon 0, 50, 75, and 100% of measured soil water removal for the full irrigation treartment. A fifth water treatment will be initiated at the 50% rate after an additional one inch of water use by the fully irrigated treatment.

Crop water use was monitored for two corn hybrids across a range in irrigation water application levels ranging from rainfed to full irrigation. Treatments included 50%, 75% and 100% of estimated crop water use based on the Modified Penman method. Soil water content was monitored using neutron attenuation and reflectometer soil water sensors to a depth of six feet below the soil surface. A sub-surface drip irrigation system was used to precisely apply irrigation water. Additional data included stage of crop development, dry matter production, stalk nitrates and grain yields. Data will be summarized by year and across a 3-4 year period. Research was undertaken to evaluate the environmental fate of artificial growth promotents used in beef cattle production under funding from the USEPA. One set of female feedlot animals were treated with an implanted growth promotent plus a feed additive while another set received no growth promotents. Surface runoff was monitored and sampled to determine if feedlot runoff contained growth promotents fed to the cattle or their derivatives. Dry manure from 2007 was composted or stockpiled following the feedlot study and was subsequently used in a rainfall simulation study and a soil leaching study. Rainfall simulations were conducted 24 hours after application and one month after application to evaluate the impact of soil residence time of the potential for surface runoff. For each simulation, each manure type from treated and untreated animals was left undisturbed after application, or incorporated using a single disk or moldboard plow plus a single disk. Chemical analysis is currently being performed on samples collected during these field studies. A graduate student will begin work on developing a model application to help predict the potential movement of the artificial growth promotents in a watershed under a range of climatic conditions.

Project Support University of Nebraska-Lincoln Agricultural Research Division
Project Website
Report
Current Status Completed
Topic Drought
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Hanson, Paul
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email phanson2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-7762
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=758
Project Information
Title Pre-Historic Drought Records from the Eastern Platte River Valley
Other(s) R. Matt Joeckel, School of Natural Resources, rjoeckel3@unl.edu; Aaron Young, School of Natural Resources, ayoung3@unl.edu 
Description Recent studies have related large-scale dune activity in the Nebraska Sandhills and elsewhere on the western Great Plains to prehistoric megadroughts. At the eastern margin of the Great Plains, however, little or no effort has been expended toward identifying the impacts and severity of these climatic events. The eastern margin of the Great Plains should be of particular interest in paleclimate studies because it represents an important biogeographic boundary that may have shifted over time. In dunes around the present confluence of the Loup and Platte Rivers near Duncan, Nebraska, optical dating contrains, for the first time, the chronology of dune activity in the central-eastern margin of the Great Plains. A total of 17 optical age estimates taken from dune sediments clearly indicate two significant periods of dune activation at 5,100 to 3,500 years ago and 850-500 years ago. These reconstructed time intervals overlap both periods of large-scale dune activity in the Nebraska Sandhills and ancient droughts identified from other paleoclimate proxy records on the western Great Plains. The agreement between results from the eastern margin of the Great Plains and data from farther west indicate that megadroughts were truly regional in their effect. In order to further test a hypothesis of geographically-widespread megadrought effects, future work will date other dune deposits in eastern Nebraska from sites along the Loup and Elkhorn Rivers, as well as dunes in east-central Kansas and western Iowa.
Project Support United States Geological Survey Statemap Program
Project Website
Report Hanson Eastern Platte Valley.pdf
Current Status Published in Geomorphology 103 (2009) 555-561
Topic Extension
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Kranz, Bill
Unit Northeast Research and Extension Center
Email wkranz1@unl.edu
Phone 402-475-3857
Web Page
Project Information
Title Northeast Research and Extension Center - Haskell Agricultural Laboratory
Other(s) Charles Shapiro, Northeast Research and Extension Center, cshapiro1@unl.edu; Dave Shelton, Northeast Research and Extension Center, dshelton2@unl.edu; Sue Lackey, Conservation and Survey, slackey1@unl.edu; Terry Mader, Haskell Ag. Lab, tmader1@unl.edu 
Description

The role of the faculty and staff in this unit is to prevent or solve problems using research based information. Faculty and staff subscribe to the notion that their programs should be high quality, ecologically sound, economically viable, socially responsible and scientifically appropriate. Learning experiences can be customized to meet the needs of a wide range of business, commodity, or governmental organizations based upon the many subject matter disciplines represented. As part of the University of Nebraska, the Northeast Center faculty and staff consider themselves to be the front door to the University in northeast Nebraska. Through well targeted training backgrounds and continuous updating via the internet and other telecommunications technologies, faculty and staff have the most current information available to help their clientele.

The Haskell Ag. Lab is a University of Nebraska research farm located 1.5 miles east of the Dixon County Fairgrounds in Concord. This 320 acre farm was donated to the University of Nebraska by the C.D. Haskell family of Laurel in 1956. A number of demonstrations and projects are going on at the Haskell Ag. Lab, including a riparian buffer strip demonstration and a study to evaluate the effect of irrigation on soybean aphid population dynamics. Other studies focus on:

Subsurface Drip Irrigation: In the spring of 2007 a new subsurface drip irrigation system was installed on a 4 acre portion of the farm with sandy loam soils. The initial objective of the research is to collect field data to document crop water use rates for new corn varieties. Specifically, the work will concentrate on varieties that have different drought resistance ratings to improve the accuracy of the information provided to producers via the High Plains Regional Climate Center. In 2007, two varieties were planted and five irrigation treatments were imposed ranging from dryland to full irrigation. The data will also be used to develop improved local crop production functions for use in the Water Optimizer spreadsheet.

Hormones in Livestock Waste: This project will evaluate the fate of both naturally occurring and synthetic hormones that are associated with solid waste harvested from beef cattle feeding facilities. The research involves: 1) tracking the fate of hormonal compounds from the feedlot into surface run-off that would make its way into a liquid storage lagoon; 2) establishing stockpiled and composted sources of the solid manure removed from the feedlot; and 3) applying stockpiled and composted manure to cropland areas under different tillage systems and native grasses. Once the manure is applied the runoff potential will be evaluated using a rainfall simulator. Research will then focus on whether plants that could be a source of food for wildlife and/or domestic animals take up the hormones. (More information about this project is available; see projects listed under Dan Snow.)

Project Support Varies according to program and project - for more information see http://nerec.unl.edu/ Hormone Project funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Project Website http://nerec.unl.edu/
Report
Current Status Continuous
Topic Hydrology
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Korus, Jesse
Unit Conservation and Survey Division
Email jkorus3@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-7561
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/staff-member.asp?pid=1010
Project Information
Title Eastern Nebraska Water Resources Assessment (ENWRA)
Other(s)

Paul Hanson, School of Natural Resources / Conservation and Survey Division, phanson2@unl.edu; Sue Lackey, School of Natural Resources / Conservation and Survey Divison, slackey1@unl.edu; Matt Marxsen, School of Natural Resources / Conservation and Survey Division, mmarxsen2@unl.edu

Dana Divine, ENWRA Project Coordinator, ddivine@lpsnrd.org

Visit the Nebraska Maps and More website (http://nebraskamaps.unl.edu/home.asp) to order an excellent publication that describes this project more in-depth, Bulletin 1: Eastern Nebraska Water Resources Assessment (ENWRA) Introduction to a Hydrogeological Study.

 
Description

Eastern Nebraska contains 70% of the state's population, but is most limited in terms of the state's groundwater supplies. The population in this region is expected to increase; thus the need for reliable water supplies is paramount. Natural resources districts (NRDs), charged with ground water management in Nebraska, seek to improve their management plans in response to growing populations, hydrologic drought, and new conjunctive management laws. Detailed mapping and characterization is necessary to delineate aquifers, assess their degree of hydrologic connection with streams and other aquifers, and better predict water quality and quantity.

In a collaborative effort between local, state, and federal agencies, the ENWRA project has been initiated to gain a clearer understanding of the region's groundwater and interconnected surface water resources. These resources can be difficult to characterize because of the complex geology created by past glaciations. Acquiring geologic and hydrologic data in the eastern, or glaciated, part of Nebraska requires the use of multiple, innovative techniques. Currently, little is known about which techniques are most effective and feasible. Once identified, the most effective and feasible tools will be used to provide data, interpretations, and models for improved water resources management.

The ENWRA group has established three pilot test sites for intensive study using a variety of investigative techniques. The goal of the initial work being done at the three pilot test sites is to determine the location, extent, and connectivity of aquifers with surface waters, with the hope of expanding these investigative techniques across other portions of eastern Nebraska. The pilot test sites are located near Oakland, Ashland, and Firth with each site exhibiting differing geologic conditions. The techniques that will be utilized in the study include: 1) helicopter electromagnetic (HEM) surveys; 2) ground-based geophysical surveys; 3) test hole drilling; and 4) geochemical analysis, just to name a few. So far HEM surveys were completed over approximately one township at each site. Other techniques were used to provide "ground truth" data to support the HEM interpretations.

The agencies involved in the ENWRA are:

  • Lower Platte South Natural Resources District
  • Lower Platte North Natural Resources District
  • Papio Missouri River Natural Resources District
  • Lower Elkhorn Natural Resources District
  • Lewis and Clark Natural Resources District
  • Nemaha Natural Resources District
  • United States Geological Survey
  • University of Nebraska Lincoln Conservation and Survey Division
  • Nebraska Department of Natural Resources
  • Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality
Project Support Nebraska Department of Natural Resources Interrelated Water Management Plan/Program
Project Website http://www.enwra.org/
Report
Current Status HEM surveys are complete and 3-D aquifer diagrams have been prepared. Report Status: Ashland area report has been prepared and is under review and the Firth area report is being written.
Pic 1 Project Image
Pic Caption 1 Eastern Nebraska Water Resources Assessment (ENWRA) Study Sites. 
Topic Hydrology
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Pederson, Darryll
Unit Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
Email dpederson2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-7563
Web Page http://eas.unl.edu/people/faculty_page.php?lastname=Pederson&firstname=Darryll&type=REG
Project Information
Title Waterfalls on the Niobrara River's Spring-fed Tributaries
Description The waterfalls on the spring-fed tributaries of the Niobrara River downstream from Valentine, Nebraska are unique in that the waterfalls are convex downstream. Groundwater discharge on either side of the waterfalls has led to significant weathering because of freeze/thaw cycles in the winter and wet/dry cycles in the summer. The water falling over the face of the falls protects them from the two weathering processes. Because the weathering rates on either side are higher than the erosion rates from falling water, the face of the falls is convex downstream. Similar waterfall face morphology occurs on the Island of Kauai where the main weathering processes are driven by vegetation and the presence of water.
Project Support National Park Service through the Great Plains Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit
Project Website http://snr.unl.edu/gpcesu/Project_library.htm
Report Waterfalls_Abstract.pdf
Current Status Completed
Topic Hydrology
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Wang, Tiejun
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email tiejunwang215@yahoo.com
Phone
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=945
Project Information
Title Niobrara River Flow Variability
Other(s) Erkan Istanbulluoglu, University of Washington, erkani@u.washington.edu 
Description This project develops a database for hydrological and climatological variables within the Niobrara River basin so that researchers may study flow variability in the Niobrara River and its historical changes. Analysis includes all existing and discontinued streamflow gages within the system. Surface water diversion data are also collected to relate to changes in the flow discharge. Annual water yield of the river is studied at Sparks and Verdel gages. A lumped annual water yield model is developed to identify the natural variables that control runoff. The model uses annual runoff as forcing variable, as well as water diversions as outflux from the system. The model is currently being extended to monthly time scales.
Project Support Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, National Park Service
Project Website
Report
Current Status Underway
Topic Recreation
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Laing, Kim (Graduate Student)
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email kmeuhe1@unl.edu
Phone n/a
Web Page
Project Information
Title Assess Extent of Disturbance by Canoeists in Tributaries to the Niobrara National Scenic River
Other(s) Kyle Hoagland, School of Natural Resources, khoagland1@unl.edu 
Description

The Niobrara is a rich and unique ecosystem. Because it is relatively swift and shallow along this reach, the Niobrara is also a popular locale for tens of thousands of canoeists each year. Frequent bottom trampling and bank destabilization can result in a variety of short and long-term changes, including bottom substrate degradation, higher levels of drift including premature drift of aquatic larvae, increased turbidity and sedimentation, and the elimination of sensitive species.

The overall goal of this project is to assess the extent of disturbance by canoeists in tributaries to the Niobrara National Scenic River and its overall impact on stream ecosystem health. This assessment will be used to evaluate resource management practices in these unique habitats, while also serving as a basis for future comparisons to assess habitat degradation.

Ten tributaries, located along the south side of the Niobrara River, were sampled each month May through September. The tributaries were divided into five streams that were potentially impacted from visitors, located upstream, and five streams that were known to have no visitors. A mini-surber sampler was used to collect invertebrates from upstream sections of the tributaries (above the waterfalls with no visitors) and from downstream sections, below the waterfalls. Current velocity, depth, width, and distance from the edge of the tributary were recorded at each location. Water temperature, pH and conductivity were measured and a water sample taken to measure total nitrogen, total phosphorus and turbidity. In June, July and August visitor information was collected by volunteers at each potentially impacted tributary. Each volunteer counted the number of times the tributary was disturbed. This information, along with daily visitor use collected by Fort Niobrara, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, was used to calculate the amount of disturbance occurring at each location.

Project Support n/a
Project Website
Report
Current Status Completed
Topic Sandhills Studies and Modeling
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Efting, Aris
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email aefting@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-3471
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=226
Project Information
Title Determining Toxic Algal Bloom Frequency in Nebraska Lakes
Description Research has been conducted in the Sandhills to determine whether or not there has been an increase in toxic algal blooms. Four different lakes were cored to identify the lakes' history of toxic algal blooms and determine whether there is an increase in toxin concentrations post 1950.
Project Support Layman Fund
Project Website
Report
Current Status Underway
Topic Water Quality
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon
Unit Civil Engineering
Email sbartelt2@unl.edu
Phone 402-554-3868
Web Page http://www.engineering.unl.edu/civil/faculty/ShannonBartelt-Hunt.shtml
Project Information
Title Fate and bioavailability of steroidogenic compounds in aquatic sediment
Other(s) Daniel Snow, School of Natural Resources, dsnow1@unl.edu; Alan Kolok, UNO School of Public Health, akolok@mail.unomaha.edu 
Description

Objective: To improve understanding of the role of sediment in the environmental fate, transformation and subsequent bioavailability of steroidogenic compounds. The central hypothesis of this study is that sediment-associated steroids remain bioavailable.

Research Questions: Are sediment-associated steroids bioavailable? How do sediment characteristics influence steroid fate? What biologically active steroid metabolites are produced in sediment?

Project Support National Science Foundation
Project Website
Report
Current Status Ongoing
Pic 1 Project Image
Pic Caption 1 A model of the project's experimental design 
Topic Water Quality
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Gosselin, Dave
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email dgosselin2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-8919
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=42
Project Information
Title Geologic Rehabilitation of Public Water Supply Wells Having High Uranium
Description

The water delivered by Clarks' public water supply wells exceeded the 30 ppb maximum contaminant level (MCL) for uranium. This project tested whether well rehabilitation, hydrogeologic avoidance and well management could be used to reduce the concentration of uranium. Interval sampling (i.e., collecting water quality samples at different depths) indicated uranium concentrations were at or below the uranium MCL at two of three different depths. Based on this data and in consultation with Nebraska Health and Human Services personnel, it was decided that a variable frequency drive pump would be installed. The installation of this pump allows operators to vary the pumping rate, thereby, reducing stress on the aquifer. Because of the distinctly lower uranium concentrations near the bottom of the well, a packer system was installed to isolate the lower 2/3 of the well screen. This project concluded that uranium concentrations decreased with depth and uranium concentrations were influenced by the introduction of oxygen into the subsurface. Further study and potential experimentation with uranium concentrations and aeration in the test well and production well is suggested.

Recently, researchers have been examining the potential for microbial communities to affect the behavior of dissolved uranium at Clarks. The metabolism of these communities may facilitate the sorption and immobilization of dissolved uranium to available metals, such as iron or sulfide. Genomic analyses of water and biofilm samples taken in April 2007 from the Clarks public water supply well and monitoring well displayed presence of metal reducing and other unknown bacteria. Further genomic analyses will provide a more specific map of the diversity of these microbes in both Clarks wells, and should improve our understanding of how the presence of these communities affects the geochemistry observed in these wells.

Project Support Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services
Project Website http://snr.unl.edu/nebraskawaterquality/
Report
Current Status Completed
Topic Water Quality
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Shelton, David
Unit Biological Systems Engineering and Extension Agricultural Engineer
Email dshelton2@unl.edu
Phone 402-584-3849
Web Page http://bse.unl.edu/dshelton2
Project Information
Title Conservation Buffers to Enhance Water Quality
Description

Conservation buffers are strips or small areas of permanent vegetation that protect and enhance water quality in three ways: 1) sediment and other particulate-bound pollutants are trapped within the buffer; 2) runoff water, often containing soluble nutrients and pesticides, is reduced through increased infiltration in the buffer; and 3) agricultural practices are physically kept away from sensitive areas. When placed along the edges of rivers, streams, and other water bodies, these vegetated areas, or riparian buffers, provide a "buffer" between the water body and adjacent land - typically crop land.

Although farmers and landowners generally strive to be stewards of the land, installation of a buffer requires that land be removed from crop production. In the case of a riparian buffer, the land adjacent to the water body is often some of the most productive land, making producers even more reluctant to take this land out of production. Also, periodic maintenance to help assure buffer performance is an expense.

To help address these and other concerns, several buffer-related projects are being conducted at the University of Nebraska Northeast Research and Extension Center and Haskell Agricultural Laboratory (HAL). One of these is a major demonstration/research buffer at HAL. The overall objective of the HAL buffer site is to maintain a large-scale demonstration and research living laboratory for natural resource professionals, producers, landowners, students, and the general public featuring a spectrum of conventional and non-conventional plant materials and designs in a natural and working agricultural environment. This buffer consists of approximately 23 acres and is 75 feet wide along each side of the entire length (approximately one mile) of the stream channel through the center of the HAL site.

The HAL buffer consists of 7 separate "areas", each having a primary focus or emphasis, as well as a number of secondary purposes aimed at meeting project objectives. Briefly, these areas are:

  • Woody decorative florals, fruits, and hazelnuts as alternative plant materials, to evaluate the suitability and income-producing potential of specialty woody plant materials (willows, dogwoods, and others) in a conservation buffer.
  • Grasses, wildflowers, and other forbs, to demonstrate and evaluate stands of different plant materials that are currently used or that may be suitable for use in conservation buffers.
  • Grass species mixtures, to demonstrate and evaluate typically recommended grass mixtures.
  • Riparian forested buffer, to demonstrate forested buffer areas designed and planted according to both current and alternative standards and specifications.
  • Alternative methods of tree and shrub establishment, to demonstrate alternative planting and establishment techniques, particularly direct seeding.
  • Weed management, to investigate weed control methods initiated the year prior to and the year of buffer establishment, and in subsequent years.
  • Alternative buffer design, to investigate and demonstrate alternative planting techniques and/or plant materials that may help maintain and/or re-establish uniform flow conditions within a buffer, thus reducing maintenance required.
Project Support University of Nebraska Agricultural Research Division
Project Website
Report
Current Status Continuous
Topic Wetlands
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Allen, Craig
Unit Nebraska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
Email callen3@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-0229
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=647
Project Information
Title Missouri River Mitigation: Implementation of Amphibian Monitoring and Adaptive Management for Wetland Restoration Evaluation
Other(s) Martin Simon, Benedictine College; Michelle Hellman, School of Natural Resources, michelle.hellman@huskers.unl.edu; Ashley Vanderham, School of Natural Resources, avanderham@huskers.unl.edu 
Description

Data are being collected to determine what constitutes a successful wetland restoration, given the desired goals of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Herpetofauna primarily amphibians are being used as indicators of wetland success. This will be accomplished by quantifying the occurrence and recruitment of amphibians at existing mitigation sites and formulating models of quality wetland restorations. These models will be used by managers in future restorations and for adaptive management approaches to the design of new wetland restorations. The study area is the Missouri River corridor of Iowa, Kansas, Missouri and Nebraska.

This project is a multi-institutional monitoring program that focuses on tightly linking monitoring with hypothesis testing in an adaptive framework. The design consists of frog call surveys to determine occupancy rates for a large number of wetlands on numerous restoration properties, coupled with intensive sampling of frogs, turtles and salamanders to assess abundance and recruitment on eight restored wetland complexes in four states. The focus areas for the Nebraska Coop Unit are three Missouri River wetland complexes located from Falls City to Omaha, Nebraska. Project collaborators at Benedictine College in Kansas are focusing on the Benedictine Wetlands in Kansas.

Click here to read a fact sheet on this project

Project Support United States Geological Survey, United States Army Corps of Engineers
Project Website http://snr.unl.edu/necoopunit/research.main.html#missouririvermitigation
Report
Current Status Underway
Topic Wildlife
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Pegg, Mark
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email mpegg2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-6824
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=739
Project Information
Title Habitat Usage of Missouri River Paddlefish Project
Description Sediment from the Niobrara River has created a delta area near the headwaters of Lewis and Clark Lake, the reservoir formed by Gavins Point Dam on the Missouri River. This sediment aggregation has reduced reservoir volume and threatens to fill the reservoir; therefore, restoration of reservoir capacity has been proposed by means of high-velocity water releases from upstream mainstem dams. Biologists, however, have reported that this delta area may serve as spawning grounds for native fishes like paddlefish, and may provide suitable spawning habitat for federally endangered pallid sturgeon. This situation has created a unique paradox where information is needed to provide insight into fulfilling both the river management needs and biological needs in the Missouri River. This project will use paddlefish telemetry to study spawning success.

Click here to read Brenda Pracheil's dissertation on Paddlefish populations

Project Support Nebraska Environmental Trust
Project Website
Report Pracheil et al_Fisheries_2012.pdf
Current Status Completed
Topic Wildlife
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Young, Chelsey
Unit Biology, UNK
Email youngca2@unk.edu
Phone 507-469-8284
Web Page
Project Information
Title A range-wide assessment of plains topminnow (Fundulus sciadicus) distribution and potential threats
Other(s) W. Wyatt Hoback, Biology UNK, hobackww@unk.edu; Keith Koupal, Biology UNK; Justin Haas 
Description The plains topminnow, Fundulus sciadicus, was once distributed from the Mississippi River to the Rocky Mountains, north to South Dakota and as far south as Oklahoma. Two centers of distribution are recognized. One is centered in Nebraska and the second is centered in Missouri. The geographic range of plains topminnow has decreased in the past decades. Plains topminnow are now considered a species of special concern in the state of Nebraska and listed as a Tier 1 species in the Nebraska Natural Legacy Project. Elimination of plains topminnow populations has been associated with introduction of invasive species, as well as loss of backwater habitats due to drought and lowered water tables. The objective of this project is to provide an updated assessment of plains topminnow distribution and population status as compared to all available historical records. Between 2004 and the present, sampling of plains topminnow revealed that in Nebraska 77% of historic Nebraska sites no longer contain plains topminnow populations. The sampling of remaining historic sites in Nebraska and neighboring states will continue in the 2009 sampling season.
Project Support n/a
Project Website
Report topminnow_range_reduction.pdf
Current Status Completed