NU Water-Related Research in the Upper Republican NRD

The list below shows water-related research being conducted within your NRD or that affects your NRD. They are sorted by water topic, then by primary contact's last name.

Displaying 7 records found for Upper Republican NRD


Topic Drought
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Knutson, Cody
Unit National Drought Mitigation Center
Email cknutson1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-6718
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=430
Project Information
Title Republican River Basin Water and Drought Portal
Other(s) Mark Svoboda, NDMC, msvoboda2@unl.edu; Donna Woudenberg, NDMC, dwoudenberg2@unl.edu; Jae Ryu, jryu@uidaho.edu 
Description The National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC) is developing a decision-support web portal for the Republican River Basin in Nebraska, Colorado and Kansas, with support from the managers and staff of the Lower, Middle and Upper Republican Natural Resources Districts (NRDs) in Nebraska. Under the terms of the two-year grant, the NDMC will collaborate with the NRDs to identify and compile local drought monitoring and planning information needed by resource managers in the basin, including government agencies, local community planners, and agricultural producers, and package it into a web portal. The portal will eventually be housed on the websites of the NRDs and can serve as a model for developing local applications of the National Integrated Drought Information System.
Project Support National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Sectoral Applications Research Program
Project Website http://www.rrbdp.org
Report
Current Status Underway
Topic Extension
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name van Donk, Simon
Unit West Central Research and Extension Center
Email svandonk2@unl.edu
Phone 308-696-6709
Web Page http://westcentral.unl.edu/web/westcentral/svandonk
Project Information
Title West Central Research and Extension Center - Gudmundsen Sandhills Laboratory
Other(s) Jim Goeke, West Central Research and Extension Center, jgoeke1@unl.edu 
Description

The University of Nebraska West Central Research and Extension Center is a research and extension facility of the University of Nebraska Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources (IANR). It serves as the site for field-based research and extension involving faculty and graduate students in eight IANR departments. West Central consists of approximately 1,800 acres of which 1,100 acres are in pasture with the remaining in dryland and irrigated cropping systems. West Central delivers research-based education and information to citizens throughout the state. Extension specialists and educators are committed to excellence, conducting educational programs customized to meet the needs of Nebraskans. These educational programs, delivered via a variety of methods, are offered through federal, state and county partnership arrangements and provide research-based information and other educational resources to the 20-county West Central district and beyond.

The Gudmundsen Sandhills Laboratory (GSL), a 13,000 acre working ranch in the Nebraska Sandhills, is also part of West Central. GSL is situated over a relatively small portion of the High Plains Aquifer where saturated thickness exceeds 1000 feet. GSL also features a valley with a live stream, a drained valley with wet meadows, an adjacent lake, dry valleys, and many dune types so that literally all the surface and groundwater locales in the Sandhills are represented and available for research. In 2004 a U.S. Climate Reference Network station was established at GSL to provide future long-term observations of temperature and precipitation accurate enough to detect present and future climate change.

Project Support Varies according to program and project - for more information see http://www.westcentral.unl.edu
Project Website http://westcentral.unl.edu/web/gudmundsen/
Report
Current Status Continuous
Topic Hydrology
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Eisenhauer, Dean
Unit Biological Systems Engineering
Email deisenhauer1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-1637
Web Page http://bse.unl.edu/eisenhauer1
Project Information
Title Impacts of Land Terracing and Small Ponds on Basin Water Supplies
Other(s) Jim Koelliker, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Kansas State University, koellik@ksu.edu; Derrel Martin, Biological Systems Engineering, dmartin2@unl.edu; Phil Barnes, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Kansas State University, lbarnes@ksu.edu; Ayse Kilic, School of Natural Resources, akilic@unl.edu 
Description

Terraces in the Republican River Basin total about 2 million acres; about 15% of the basin above Hardy, Nebraska is terraced. The goal of this project is to better understand how on-farm conservation practices, specifically terraces and small ponds, affect the basin's water supplies. Data has been collected at five dryland fields near Culbertson, Curtis, and Stamford, Nebraska and Colby and Norton, Kansas. The Kansas sites are in areas where three main tributaries of the Republican River - Beaver, Sappa, and Prairie Dog creeks - flow toward Harlan County Reservoir. The field data collected will be used to determine if computer models created for the Republican River Basin accurately measure the impact of conservation terraces and small reservoirs on the basin.

Initial research results show:

  • About 16% of land in the Republican Basin is protected by terraces, and an equal number by small reservoirs
  • About 45% of runoff into a terrace channel goes to evapotranspiration (ET), 45% goes to groundwater recharge, and 10% overtops the terraces
  • Small reservoirs retain about 90% of inflow, most of which goes to groundwater recharge - little evaporation
  • Much overland flow is loss in transmission as recharge or ET from plants in the creek

Integrated values for the basin be completed by the end of 2010. For more information, see the following slides presented at the 2010 Greater Platte Basins Symposium:

Project Support U.S. Bureau of Reclamation
Project Website http://watercenter.unl.edu/PRS/PRS2010/Presentations/Eisenhauer%20Dean.pdf
Report
Current Status Continuing
Topic Hydrology
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Woldt, Wayne
Unit Southeast Research and Extension Center
Email wwoldt1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-8656
Web Page http://bse.unl.edu/wwoldt1
Project Information
Title Watershed Modeling System
Description Due to the highly connected nature of the water resources in the Republican River region, the significant increase in groundwater utilization for irrigation is suspected of inducing changes to the surface water system. These changes are exacerbated by drought conditions. Therefore, a greater understanding of the complex surface-groundwater system is very important for better management of water resources in the area. This project involves developing a watershed modeling system capable of simulating subsurface, overland, and stream flow in a fully integrated manner. This model considers various hydrogeological properties and therefore provides a more real picture of groundwater and surface water flow patterns and connections in the region. (This modeling system is different than traditional models such as ModFlow.) The objective of the research is to study the interaction processes of groundwater and surface water flow. The second objective is to progress toward simulating large-scale watersheds and significant amounts of data with increased time efficiency.
Project Support n/a
Project Website
Report
Current Status Underway
Topic Riparian Vegetation Water Use
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Lenters, John
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email jlenters2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-9044
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=743
Project Information
Title Riparian Vegetation Impacts on Water Quantity, Quality, and Stream Ecology
Other(s) Kyle Herrman, University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point, Kyle.Herrman@uwsp.edu; Erkan Istanbulluoglu, University of Washington, erkani@u.washington.edu; Durelle Scott, Virginia Tech, dscott@vt.edu; Tiejun Wang, University of Washington-Seattle, tjwang@u.washington.edu 
Description

The State of Nebraska is attempting to aggressively manage invasive species along the riparian corridors of the Platte River and the Republican River. Although the impetus for the removal is different, in both basins state agencies and weed management districts are using herbicides and mechanical removal to control a combination of invasive species led by Phragmites australis (common reed), Tamarix ramosissima Ledeb. (saltcedar), and Elaeagnus angustifolia L. (Russian olive).

Along the central stretch of the Platte River, invasive species have overtaken sandbars and side channels which are invaluable wildlife habitat. In an attempt to reclaim this habitat for bird species such as the Piping Plover and Whooping Crane, the state is removing large stretches of common reed. Along the Republican River, the state is removing all invasive species to reduce riparian evapotranspiration. By reducing evapotranspiration the hope is to increase stream flow along the Republican River. Since 2007 invasive species along the mainstem of the river and along the banks of the Harlan Reservoir have been sprayed with herbicide or mechanically removed.

In order to understand the impacts of removing invasive species along riparian corridors researchers at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and collaborators at other universities have developed a multi-faceted research project.

On the Republican River basin researchers are directly measuring evapotranspiration rates from native and invasive plants. Researchers are also using a regional water balance model to estimate the water savings that could be achieved by removing all invasive species within the basin.

On the Platte River researchers are monitoring water quality changes associated with a controlled herbicide treatment of common reed. Using a combination of in situ instruments and grab samplers researchers are determining the impacts of species removal. Other experiments are being conducted to measure how invasive species alter biogeochemical processes and sediment characterization.

Visit the project website for more information, including real-time meteorological data from a riparian wetland near the Republican River, real-time water quality data at a stream site on the Platte River, and quarterly project reports.

Project Support Nebraska Environmental Trust, University of Nebraska Rural Initiative, University of Nebraska Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources
Project Website http://www.geosciences.unl.edu/riparian/
Report
Current Status

Final Report on Riparian Vegetation Impacts on Water Quantity, Quality, and Stream Ecology

Topic Riparian Vegetation Water Use
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Martin, Derrel
Unit Biological Systems Engineering
Email dmartin2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-1586
Web Page http://bse.unl.edu/faculty/Martin.shtml
Project Information
Title Estimation of Evapotranspiration from Riparian and Invasive Species Using Remote Sensing and in Situ Measurements in the Republican River Basin
Other(s) Ayse Kilic, School of Natural Resources, akilic@unl.edu; Suat Irmak, Biological Systems Engineering, sirmak2@unl.edu; Shashi Verma, School of Natural Resources, sverma1@unl.edu; Tala Awada, School of Natural Resources, tawada2@unl.edu 
Description

This study is using a combination of techniques including remote sensing, to develop reliable estimates of evapotranspiration from riparian zones and determine varying water use rates for typical and invasive species in the Republican River Basin. The project will provide datasets of evapotranspiration and the annual water balance for a range of conditions in the riparian areas along the Republican River. Specific deliverables of the project include:

  • Map of surface energy fluxes, including evapotranspiration, across three watersheds in the Lower, Middle and Upper Republican Natural Resources Districts for different spatial and temporal (i.e. daily, seasonal and annual) scales.
  • Map of riparian vegetation classification across three watersheds using high resolution remote-sensing and ground truth observations.
  • Comparison of water use and water availability on riparian vegetation and adjacent treated research area by measuring evapotranspiration rates, using various methods.
  • Data for planners and decision-makers to develop water management policies.
  • Extension and education materials to inform and communicate results to stakeholders.
Project Support Nebraska Department of Natural Resources
Project Website
Report
Current Status Underway
Topic Watershed Management
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Knutson, Cody (advisor)
Unit National Drought Mitigation Center
Email cknutson1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-6718
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=430
Project Information
Title Stakeholder Perceptions of Water Supply Management and Sustainability in the Republican River Basin in Nebraska
Other(s) Ryan Bjerke, ryan.bjerke@huskers.unl.edu 
Description Due to a variety of human-induced and natural factors, water resources throughout the world will continue to face mounting challenges to their longevity and extent, and those within the Republican River Basin in Nebraska are no exception. Understanding the perspectives of water users is essential for developing informed and effective water resource policies and management plans. This study utilized a key informant sampling strategy in conjunction with in-depth telephone interviews to ascertain the perceptions of 32 key stakeholders in the Republican River Basin in Nebraska on concepts pertaining to water supply management and sustainability. The interview questionnaire was designed using a mixed methods approach that relied on qualitative and quantitative measures. Specifically, stakeholders were asked a series of questions to understand their perspectives on: the causes of water supply stress in the basin; what sustainable water management meant to them; the sustainability of water resources in the basin; and solutions that could be implemented to reduce water supply stress in the basin (e.g., financial, regulatory, infrastructure development, and water conservation and technical options). The study found a majority of individuals attributed ground water level declines to increased ground water use, more ground water users, and changing climate, while most believed surface water flow reductions were due to these factors in addition to soil and water conservation measures and increased near- and in-channel plant growth. Because of the need to maintain economic viability and protect water for future generations, water resource sustainability was very important to participants. Stakeholders thought solutions to water resources issues could be best achieved by employing a combination of: regulatory measures, like irrigated acreage and pumping limits; water conservation options, such as crop rotations and conservation tillage; and technological advancements, like more water-efficient irrigation systems and improved hybrids. Overall, eliciting stakeholder's perceptions on issues related to water supply stress and sustainability, along with potential solutions, may help inform policy and management decisions aimed at promoting water resource sustainability in the basin.
Project Support
Project Website
Report
Current Status Graduate thesis project completed December 2009 - thesis available at UNL CY Thompson Library (Call # LD3656 2009 .B547)