NU Water-Related Research in Northeast WMA

The list below shows water-related research being conducted within your WMA or that affects your WMA. They are sorted by water topic, then by primary contact's last name.

Displaying 25 records found for Northeast WMA


Topic Climate
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Shulski, Martha
Unit High Plains Regional Climate Center
Email mshulski3@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-6711
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=474
Project Information
Title High Plains Regional Climate Center - Monitoring Stations
Description

As the demand for water grows, it is important to have reliable information for various assessments, such as drought, fire, and water development. In an effort to understand the surface hydrology and the water and energy interactions at the surface, scientists with the High Plains Regional Climate Center have installed a series of monitoring stations that collect temperature, humidity, solar radiation, windspeed and direction, soil temperature, precipitation and soil moisture data. These stations take hourly and daily data which can be used to calculate evapotranspiration and water balance terms. Monitoring equipment is located near Higgins Ranch, Sparks, Merritt, Ainsworth, New Port, Barta, Gudmundsens, Halsey, and Merna.

Volunteers supplement these stations by using rain gauges to monitor precipitation; volunteers enter their data online as part of the Nebraska Rainfall Assessment and Information Network (NeRAIN). In total volunteers from 40 states contribute precipitation data to the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS). The CoCoRaHS network has been incorporated into the Applied Climate Information System (ACIS), which allows resource managers, researchers, and decision-makers to better access data.

Project Support National Climatic Data Center
Project Website http://hprcc.unl.edu
Report
Current Status Continuing
Topic Crop Water Use
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Kranz, Bill
Unit Northeast Research and Extension Center
Email wkranz1@unl.edu
Phone 402-475-3857
Web Page http://bse.unl.edu/web/bse/wkranz1
Project Information
Title Irrigation Management for Improved Water and Chemical Utilization
Other(s) on field research study on the environmental fate of artificial growth promotents - Daniel D. Snow, School of Natural Resources, dsnow1@unl.edu; Charles Shapiro, Northeast Research and Extension Center, cshapiro1@unl.edu; Terry Mader, Northeast Research and Extension Center, tmader1@unl.edu; Dave Shelton, Northeast Research and Extension Center, dshelton2@unl.edu; Simon Van Donk, West Central Research and Extension Center, svandonk2@unl.edu; Tian Zhang, Civil Engineering, tzhang@unlnotes.unl.edu 
Description

Current Nebraska crop water use rates are based upon field data collected over 20 years ago. Since corn genetics have changed drastically during the past 20 years, this project seeks to provide irrigators in northeast Nebraska with crop water use rates for a range in corn genetics and plant populations. More specifically, this project will determine crop water use rates for corn hybrids developed for maximum yield under high stress and maximum yield under fully irrigated conditions, thus helping to define the impact of reduced irrigation on corn water use rates and grain yield. This project also seeks to use long term modeling of nitrate leaching losses to identify the msot environmentally sound swine manure application strategy. This research will be conducted at the Haskell Ag. Lab. So far a new subsurface drip irrigation system has been installed and equipped with soil water monitoring equipment. Water applications will be based upon 0, 50, 75, and 100% of measured soil water removal for the full irrigation treartment. A fifth water treatment will be initiated at the 50% rate after an additional one inch of water use by the fully irrigated treatment.

Crop water use was monitored for two corn hybrids across a range in irrigation water application levels ranging from rainfed to full irrigation. Treatments included 50%, 75% and 100% of estimated crop water use based on the Modified Penman method. Soil water content was monitored using neutron attenuation and reflectometer soil water sensors to a depth of six feet below the soil surface. A sub-surface drip irrigation system was used to precisely apply irrigation water. Additional data included stage of crop development, dry matter production, stalk nitrates and grain yields. Data will be summarized by year and across a 3-4 year period. Research was undertaken to evaluate the environmental fate of artificial growth promotents used in beef cattle production under funding from the USEPA. One set of female feedlot animals were treated with an implanted growth promotent plus a feed additive while another set received no growth promotents. Surface runoff was monitored and sampled to determine if feedlot runoff contained growth promotents fed to the cattle or their derivatives. Dry manure from 2007 was composted or stockpiled following the feedlot study and was subsequently used in a rainfall simulation study and a soil leaching study. Rainfall simulations were conducted 24 hours after application and one month after application to evaluate the impact of soil residence time of the potential for surface runoff. For each simulation, each manure type from treated and untreated animals was left undisturbed after application, or incorporated using a single disk or moldboard plow plus a single disk. Chemical analysis is currently being performed on samples collected during these field studies. A graduate student will begin work on developing a model application to help predict the potential movement of the artificial growth promotents in a watershed under a range of climatic conditions.

Project Support University of Nebraska-Lincoln Agricultural Research Division
Project Website
Report
Current Status Completed
Topic Drought
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Hanson, Paul
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email phanson2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-7762
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=758
Project Information
Title Pre-Historic Drought Records from the Eastern Platte River Valley
Other(s) R. Matt Joeckel, School of Natural Resources, rjoeckel3@unl.edu; Aaron Young, School of Natural Resources, ayoung3@unl.edu 
Description Recent studies have related large-scale dune activity in the Nebraska Sandhills and elsewhere on the western Great Plains to prehistoric megadroughts. At the eastern margin of the Great Plains, however, little or no effort has been expended toward identifying the impacts and severity of these climatic events. The eastern margin of the Great Plains should be of particular interest in paleclimate studies because it represents an important biogeographic boundary that may have shifted over time. In dunes around the present confluence of the Loup and Platte Rivers near Duncan, Nebraska, optical dating contrains, for the first time, the chronology of dune activity in the central-eastern margin of the Great Plains. A total of 17 optical age estimates taken from dune sediments clearly indicate two significant periods of dune activation at 5,100 to 3,500 years ago and 850-500 years ago. These reconstructed time intervals overlap both periods of large-scale dune activity in the Nebraska Sandhills and ancient droughts identified from other paleoclimate proxy records on the western Great Plains. The agreement between results from the eastern margin of the Great Plains and data from farther west indicate that megadroughts were truly regional in their effect. In order to further test a hypothesis of geographically-widespread megadrought effects, future work will date other dune deposits in eastern Nebraska from sites along the Loup and Elkhorn Rivers, as well as dunes in east-central Kansas and western Iowa.
Project Support United States Geological Survey Statemap Program
Project Website
Report Hanson Eastern Platte Valley.pdf
Current Status Published in Geomorphology 103 (2009) 555-561
Topic Extension
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Kranz, Bill
Unit Northeast Research and Extension Center
Email wkranz1@unl.edu
Phone 402-475-3857
Web Page
Project Information
Title Northeast Research and Extension Center - Haskell Agricultural Laboratory
Other(s) Charles Shapiro, Northeast Research and Extension Center, cshapiro1@unl.edu; Dave Shelton, Northeast Research and Extension Center, dshelton2@unl.edu; Sue Lackey, Conservation and Survey, slackey1@unl.edu; Terry Mader, Haskell Ag. Lab, tmader1@unl.edu 
Description

The role of the faculty and staff in this unit is to prevent or solve problems using research based information. Faculty and staff subscribe to the notion that their programs should be high quality, ecologically sound, economically viable, socially responsible and scientifically appropriate. Learning experiences can be customized to meet the needs of a wide range of business, commodity, or governmental organizations based upon the many subject matter disciplines represented. As part of the University of Nebraska, the Northeast Center faculty and staff consider themselves to be the front door to the University in northeast Nebraska. Through well targeted training backgrounds and continuous updating via the internet and other telecommunications technologies, faculty and staff have the most current information available to help their clientele.

The Haskell Ag. Lab is a University of Nebraska research farm located 1.5 miles east of the Dixon County Fairgrounds in Concord. This 320 acre farm was donated to the University of Nebraska by the C.D. Haskell family of Laurel in 1956. A number of demonstrations and projects are going on at the Haskell Ag. Lab, including a riparian buffer strip demonstration and a study to evaluate the effect of irrigation on soybean aphid population dynamics. Other studies focus on:

Subsurface Drip Irrigation: In the spring of 2007 a new subsurface drip irrigation system was installed on a 4 acre portion of the farm with sandy loam soils. The initial objective of the research is to collect field data to document crop water use rates for new corn varieties. Specifically, the work will concentrate on varieties that have different drought resistance ratings to improve the accuracy of the information provided to producers via the High Plains Regional Climate Center. In 2007, two varieties were planted and five irrigation treatments were imposed ranging from dryland to full irrigation. The data will also be used to develop improved local crop production functions for use in the Water Optimizer spreadsheet.

Hormones in Livestock Waste: This project will evaluate the fate of both naturally occurring and synthetic hormones that are associated with solid waste harvested from beef cattle feeding facilities. The research involves: 1) tracking the fate of hormonal compounds from the feedlot into surface run-off that would make its way into a liquid storage lagoon; 2) establishing stockpiled and composted sources of the solid manure removed from the feedlot; and 3) applying stockpiled and composted manure to cropland areas under different tillage systems and native grasses. Once the manure is applied the runoff potential will be evaluated using a rainfall simulator. Research will then focus on whether plants that could be a source of food for wildlife and/or domestic animals take up the hormones. (More information about this project is available; see projects listed under Dan Snow.)

Project Support Varies according to program and project - for more information see http://nerec.unl.edu/ Hormone Project funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Project Website http://nerec.unl.edu/
Report
Current Status Continuous
Topic Extension
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Kranz, Bill
Unit Northeast Research and Extension Center
Email wkranz1@unl.edu
Phone 402-584-3857
Web Page http://bse.unl.edu/web/bse/wkranz1
Project Information
Title Demonstration Projects and Field Tours
Other(s) Charles Shapiro, Northeast Research and Extension Center, cshapiro1@unl.edu. 
Description

A project associated with using beef manure compost on sandy soils is being conducted near Pierce and Plainview as a means of improving soil quality, using a beef production by-product in crop production and reducing commercial fertilizer application. The data collected at these two sites has been presented by Charles Shapiro at several educational meetings across northeast Nebraska. The project shows a slight improvement is some parameters, but the cost of transportation reduces the quantity of compost that can be transported and so the effect on soil physical properties is minimal, although soil phosphorus levels are increasing.

Near Pierce a project funded by the Lower Elkhorn Natural Resources District aims to demonstrate the impact of reducing season long water application by 10% on corn yield. At this site the farmer uses a computer control panel to speed up or slow down his center pivot automatically to apply 10% less or 10% more than his normal application, respectively. Nitrogen is being applied at three different rates to demonstrate the adequacy of the UNL Calculation Procedure.

Near Brunswick a project funded by the Upper Elkhorn Natural Resources District aims to develop improved nitrogen credit following soybeans in a corn-soybean rotation. Six nitrogen treatments and 6 different cropping sequences have been imposed to determine the nitrogen credit from soybeans on sandy soils. This project will run through the 2008 growing season. To date data suggests lower nitrogen credits on the sands than the silt loam soils in eastern Nebraska.

Project Support Lower Elkhorn Natural Resources District, Upper Elkhorn Natural Resources District
Project Website
Report
Current Status Continuous
Topic Groundwater
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Swinehart, James B.
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email jswinehart1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-7529
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=487
Project Information
Title Geology and Groundwater Supplies of Box Butte County, Nebraska
Other(s) Vernon L. Souders (project lead, retired); Frank A. Smith (retired), fsmith1@unl.edu 
Description

This report describes the relationship between the geology and the groundwater supplies in Box Butte County. It also evaluates the aquifers with respect to waterbearing characteristics and groundwater in storage. It further describes recharge to and discharge from the aquifers, outlines the movement of groundwater in the county, and summarizes the changes in groundwater storage that have occurred since the advent of irrigation in the county. Brief descriptions of the topography and drainage are included. An evaluation of climatic data for Box Butte County and the Nebraska Panhandle is incorporated into this report and several observations are made about climate in relation to groundwater and the irrigation requirements of crops. Brief mention is made of the soils and agricultural activity in the county.

The report estimates that to date (1975-1976) the amount of groundwater in storage has decreased 2-3% since 1938 and perhaps 1/2 of this decrease has occurred since 1964. The most serious water level declines were immediately north of Alliance in an area where the groundwater resource is large. This area had the highest concentration of irrigation wells and is also the oldest irrigated part of the county.

The report explicitly does not answer the question, "How long will the water supply last?" Rather the authors make the point that economic considerations and social attitudes are just as important as the characteristics of local groundwater supplies in answering that question.

Project Support Upper Niobrara White Natural Resources District, U.S. Geological Survey
Project Website
Report WSP-47.pdf
Current Status Test Holes Drilled Fall 1975-Spring 1976, Report Published 1980. An electronic copy of the report is available above; A hard copy is available via Nebraska Maps and More
Topic Hydrology
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Ayers, Jerry
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email jayers1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-0996
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=5
Project Information
Title Box Butte County / Niobrara River Numerical Groundwater Flow Model Studies
Description

The main objective of these studies was to determine the effect, if any, of large-scale regional pumping on the base flow of the Niobrara River. One study involved the construction and implementation of a groundwater-flow model for Box Butte County and the surrounding region to simulate hydrogeologic and hydraulic conditions, including groundwater extraction by large-capacity wells. The other study focused on the upper reaches of the Niobrara River to obtain estimates of stream-bed hydraulic conductivity (i.e., the ease with which water can move through pore spaces or fractures in the stream-bed) to be used as input to the modeling effort.

The groundwater-flow model was calibrated to predevelopment by primarily adjusting recharge flux through a trial-and-error process until a reasonable fit was obtained to the observed water table configuration of 1938. Once calibrated to predevelopment heads, transient simulations (i.e., simulations taking into account real-life conditions, thus modeling potential real-life changes in the basin), were run to model the change in heads due to pumping for the time period between 1938 and 2005. Results from these simulations were compared with observed heads for available years. After satisfactory results were obtained from the transient simulations, two additional scenarios were tested. These were simulations where all wells were turned off and where only those wells in Box Butte County and its proximity were active. The computer program ZONEBUDGET, which computes the water budget for user-defined zones, was run coincident with all simulations. Both head and water budget computation results were then used to determine the effect of pumping on the base flow the Niobrara River.

Based on model results, reductions in the base flow of the Niobrara River is due primarily to localized pumping effects, rather than from groundwater extraction on a regional scale. A comparison of simulated outflow values for selected reaches of the Niobrara River indicates that 1) flow characteristics in the uppermost part of the basin did not change greatly over the period of pumping indicating that base flow is not significantly reduced by large-scale pumping, 2) significant changes in base flow appear to have occurred after about 1960 in the middle and lower reaches, 3) the maximum change in flow for the middle reach due to all wells pumping is 19.6% and only 4.4% for Box Butte wells, with both maximum reductions occurring at the end of the 2005 pumping season, 4) the maximum change in flow for the lower reach is about 24.4% for all wells and only 2.5% for Box Butte wells, again, both occur at the end of the 2005 pumping season. Overall, the Niobrara River appears to be a gaining stream along most of its flow path, with the exception of the uppermost part of the basin.

The conclusion is that the affects of large-scale regional pumping appears to not impact base flow in the Niobrara River to any significant degree. Rather, localized pumping, especially where irrigation wells are situated near the river, reduces base flow on the order of 20% to 25%. For the most part, the Niobrara River valley is somewhat isolated from the extensive pumping taking place in Box Butte County. The upper reach is sufficiently distant from the pumping center that the cone of depression has little effect on the water table. Much of the middle reach transects units of the White River group that are considered to be nearly impermeable, and thus, provide a hydrogeologic barrier, preventing the northward expansion of the cone of depression. Pumping along the lower reach of the Niobrara River has a much greater influence on base flow reduction simply due to the proximity of the extraction wells to the river.

Project Support Nebraska Department of Natural Resources
Project Website http://www.dnr.state.ne.us/Publications_Studies/Box-Butte_ModelProjectCompletionReport.pdf
Report
Current Status Completed
Topic Hydrology
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Chen, Xun-Hong
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email xchen2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-0772
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=19
Project Information
Title Hydrologic Connections in the Elkhorn River Basin
Other(s) Sue Lackey, Conservation and Survey, slackey1@unl.edu 
Description This project involves investigating the hydrologic connections between streams and the adjacent aquifer systems in the Elkhorn River Basin. Researchers have used a Geoprobe direct-push technique, in-situ permeameter tests, and a thermal camera to collect data in this basin. Research has been conducted in Taylor Creek (west of the City of Madison), in Maple Creek, and two sites in the Elkhorn River near Norfolk and Meadow Grove. Ultimately this data will be used for integrated management of surface and groundwater resources.
Project Support Nebraska Department of Natural Resources, Upper Elkhorn Natural Resources District, Lower Elkhorn Natural Resources District
Project Website
Report
Current Status Continuous
Pic 1 Project Image
Pic Caption 1 This image shows our work in the Elkhorn River near Meadow Grove and in Taylor Creek. 
Pic 2 Project Image 2
Pic Caption 2 Direct-push techniques used by UNL researchers for study of stream-aquifer connections in Madison County, Nebraska. 
Topic Hydrology
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Korus, Jesse
Unit Conservation and Survey Division
Email jkorus3@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-7561
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/staff-member.asp?pid=1010
Project Information
Title Eastern Nebraska Water Resources Assessment (ENWRA)
Other(s)

Paul Hanson, School of Natural Resources / Conservation and Survey Division, phanson2@unl.edu; Sue Lackey, School of Natural Resources / Conservation and Survey Divison, slackey1@unl.edu; Matt Marxsen, School of Natural Resources / Conservation and Survey Division, mmarxsen2@unl.edu

Dana Divine, ENWRA Project Coordinator, ddivine@lpsnrd.org

Visit the Nebraska Maps and More website (http://nebraskamaps.unl.edu/home.asp) to order an excellent publication that describes this project more in-depth, Bulletin 1: Eastern Nebraska Water Resources Assessment (ENWRA) Introduction to a Hydrogeological Study.

 
Description

Eastern Nebraska contains 70% of the state's population, but is most limited in terms of the state's groundwater supplies. The population in this region is expected to increase; thus the need for reliable water supplies is paramount. Natural resources districts (NRDs), charged with ground water management in Nebraska, seek to improve their management plans in response to growing populations, hydrologic drought, and new conjunctive management laws. Detailed mapping and characterization is necessary to delineate aquifers, assess their degree of hydrologic connection with streams and other aquifers, and better predict water quality and quantity.

In a collaborative effort between local, state, and federal agencies, the ENWRA project has been initiated to gain a clearer understanding of the region's groundwater and interconnected surface water resources. These resources can be difficult to characterize because of the complex geology created by past glaciations. Acquiring geologic and hydrologic data in the eastern, or glaciated, part of Nebraska requires the use of multiple, innovative techniques. Currently, little is known about which techniques are most effective and feasible. Once identified, the most effective and feasible tools will be used to provide data, interpretations, and models for improved water resources management.

The ENWRA group has established three pilot test sites for intensive study using a variety of investigative techniques. The goal of the initial work being done at the three pilot test sites is to determine the location, extent, and connectivity of aquifers with surface waters, with the hope of expanding these investigative techniques across other portions of eastern Nebraska. The pilot test sites are located near Oakland, Ashland, and Firth with each site exhibiting differing geologic conditions. The techniques that will be utilized in the study include: 1) helicopter electromagnetic (HEM) surveys; 2) ground-based geophysical surveys; 3) test hole drilling; and 4) geochemical analysis, just to name a few. So far HEM surveys were completed over approximately one township at each site. Other techniques were used to provide "ground truth" data to support the HEM interpretations.

The agencies involved in the ENWRA are:

  • Lower Platte South Natural Resources District
  • Lower Platte North Natural Resources District
  • Papio Missouri River Natural Resources District
  • Lower Elkhorn Natural Resources District
  • Lewis and Clark Natural Resources District
  • Nemaha Natural Resources District
  • United States Geological Survey
  • University of Nebraska Lincoln Conservation and Survey Division
  • Nebraska Department of Natural Resources
  • Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality
Project Support Nebraska Department of Natural Resources Interrelated Water Management Plan/Program
Project Website http://www.enwra.org/
Report
Current Status HEM surveys are complete and 3-D aquifer diagrams have been prepared. Report Status: Ashland area report has been prepared and is under review and the Firth area report is being written.
Pic 1 Project Image
Pic Caption 1 Eastern Nebraska Water Resources Assessment (ENWRA) Study Sites. 
Topic Hydrology
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Lenters, John
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email jlenters2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-9044
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=743
Project Information
Title On Basin Residence Time and Annual Hydrology: Development of Annual Hydrology Model of the Sandhills Rivers
Other(s) Erkan Istanbulluoglu, University of Washington, erkani@u.washington.edu; Durelle Scott, Virginia Tech, dscott@vt.edu; Tiejun Wang, University of Washington-Seattle, tjwang@u.washington.edu 
Description

Simple models of annual and mean annual basin runoff and evapotranspration, such as the one proposed by Budyko, are useful for investigating the relationship between river flow and climate, and planning water storage structures in basins where long term streamflow measurements are not available. Such models are often based on the assumption that annual precipitation is in balance with annual runoff and evapotranspiration, and change in water storage of the basin is negligible. In basins where groundwater is the dominant source of streamflow this assumption hardly holds.

In this study first we develop a technique to investigate groundwater residence time to identify time scales over which a simple model of mean annual runoff can be meaningfully used. The model is applied in the Niobrara and Loup Rivers. Second we develop an annual hydrology model by solving the rate of change in basin storage. The runoff component of the model is based on the well-known linear reservoir model and a parameterization to characterize runoff on saturated areas. River water storages and streamflow diverted for irrigation are included as inputs in the model. The model explained as high as 80% of the annual variability of runoff in the Niobrara River at the Sparks gage. The model underscores the importance of saturation overland flow in the basin. Finally we used the model to investigate climate change scenarios, including extreme dry and wet conditions, as well as scenarios for the Medieval Warm Period during which Sandhills were destabilized as suggested by geological evidence.

Project presentation at the 2008 Water Colloquium

Project Support National Science Foundation
Project Website
Report Lenters_Groundwater.pdf
Current Status Published "On the role of groundwater and soil texture in the regional water balance: An investigation of the Nebraska Sand Hills", USA, Water Resour. Res., 45, W10413, doi:10.1029/2009WR007733.
Topic Hydrology
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Pederson, Darryll
Unit Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
Email dpederson2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-7563
Web Page http://eas.unl.edu/people/faculty_page.php?lastname=Pederson&firstname=Darryll&type=REG
Project Information
Title Waterfalls on the Niobrara River's Spring-fed Tributaries
Description The waterfalls on the spring-fed tributaries of the Niobrara River downstream from Valentine, Nebraska are unique in that the waterfalls are convex downstream. Groundwater discharge on either side of the waterfalls has led to significant weathering because of freeze/thaw cycles in the winter and wet/dry cycles in the summer. The water falling over the face of the falls protects them from the two weathering processes. Because the weathering rates on either side are higher than the erosion rates from falling water, the face of the falls is convex downstream. Similar waterfall face morphology occurs on the Island of Kauai where the main weathering processes are driven by vegetation and the presence of water.
Project Support National Park Service through the Great Plains Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit
Project Website http://snr.unl.edu/gpcesu/Project_library.htm
Report Waterfalls_Abstract.pdf
Current Status Completed
Topic Hydrology
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Wang, Tiejun
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email tiejunwang215@yahoo.com
Phone
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=945
Project Information
Title Niobrara River Flow Variability
Other(s) Erkan Istanbulluoglu, University of Washington, erkani@u.washington.edu 
Description This project develops a database for hydrological and climatological variables within the Niobrara River basin so that researchers may study flow variability in the Niobrara River and its historical changes. Analysis includes all existing and discontinued streamflow gages within the system. Surface water diversion data are also collected to relate to changes in the flow discharge. Annual water yield of the river is studied at Sparks and Verdel gages. A lumped annual water yield model is developed to identify the natural variables that control runoff. The model uses annual runoff as forcing variable, as well as water diversions as outflux from the system. The model is currently being extended to monthly time scales.
Project Support Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, National Park Service
Project Website
Report
Current Status Underway
Topic Recreation
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Laing, Kim (Graduate Student)
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email kmeuhe1@unl.edu
Phone n/a
Web Page
Project Information
Title Assess Extent of Disturbance by Canoeists in Tributaries to the Niobrara National Scenic River
Other(s) Kyle Hoagland, School of Natural Resources, khoagland1@unl.edu 
Description

The Niobrara is a rich and unique ecosystem. Because it is relatively swift and shallow along this reach, the Niobrara is also a popular locale for tens of thousands of canoeists each year. Frequent bottom trampling and bank destabilization can result in a variety of short and long-term changes, including bottom substrate degradation, higher levels of drift including premature drift of aquatic larvae, increased turbidity and sedimentation, and the elimination of sensitive species.

The overall goal of this project is to assess the extent of disturbance by canoeists in tributaries to the Niobrara National Scenic River and its overall impact on stream ecosystem health. This assessment will be used to evaluate resource management practices in these unique habitats, while also serving as a basis for future comparisons to assess habitat degradation.

Ten tributaries, located along the south side of the Niobrara River, were sampled each month May through September. The tributaries were divided into five streams that were potentially impacted from visitors, located upstream, and five streams that were known to have no visitors. A mini-surber sampler was used to collect invertebrates from upstream sections of the tributaries (above the waterfalls with no visitors) and from downstream sections, below the waterfalls. Current velocity, depth, width, and distance from the edge of the tributary were recorded at each location. Water temperature, pH and conductivity were measured and a water sample taken to measure total nitrogen, total phosphorus and turbidity. In June, July and August visitor information was collected by volunteers at each potentially impacted tributary. Each volunteer counted the number of times the tributary was disturbed. This information, along with daily visitor use collected by Fort Niobrara, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, was used to calculate the amount of disturbance occurring at each location.

Project Support n/a
Project Website
Report
Current Status Completed
Topic Recreation
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Shultz, Steve
Unit UNO Real Estate Research Center
Email sshultz@mail.unomaha.edu
Phone 402-554-2810
Web Page http://cba.unomaha.edu/dir/HomePageBio.cfm?id=347
Project Information
Title Economic and Social Values of Recreation on the Niobrara National Scenic River
Description

The goal of this project is to generate objective and accurate economic data and analyses that will allow the State of Nebraska to evaluate an in-stream appropriation on the Niobrara River for recreation purposes. Nebraska in-stream flow laws and regulations as stated in statute 46-2,116 specify that an in-stream appropriation must be in the public interest on the basis of:

  • The econmic, social, and environmental value of the in-stream use or uses including, but not limited to, recreation, fish and wildlife, induced recharge for municipal water systems, and water quality maintenance; and
  • The economic, social, and environmental value of reasonably foreseeable alternative out-of-stream uses of water that will be foregone or accorded junior status if the appropriation is granted.

The economic value of in-stream uses for recreation will involve estimates of both direct expenditures by river recreationists and the value of their use of the Niobrara Scenic River for boating and tubing using a travel cost model. The economic value of reasonably forseeable alternative out-of-stream uses will be determined by estimating the change in economic value of irrigation in the Niobrara River watershed based upon agricultural land sales from 2000 to 2007. The societal values associated with in-stream flows of and recreation on the Niobrara River will also be calculated using a telephone survey.

Project presentation at the 2008 Water Colloquium

Project Support Nebraska Game and Parks Commission
Project Website
Report Niobrara_Values.pdf
Current Status Completed
Topic Sandhills Studies and Modeling
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Billesbach, Dave
Unit Biological Systems Engineering
Email dbillesbach1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-7961
Web Page http://bse.unl.edu/faculty/Billesbach.shtml
Project Information
Title Effects of Precipitation and Groundwater on Grassland Productivity in the Nebraska Sand Hills
Other(s) Tim Arkebauer, Agronomy and Horticulture, tarkebauer1@unl.edu 
Description

In the Sand Hills the depth to groundwater greatly affects the types and amounts of grasses that grow there, suggesting a strong linkage between groundwater, precipitation, and grass productivity. Wet meadows are where the water rable is usually less than a meter below the surface and make up about 10% of the Sand Hills land area. Dry valleys are where the water table never intersects the land surface and usually lies several meters below; dry valleys also make up about 10% of the Sand Hills land area. Except for lakes and wetlands (about 2% of the land area), the rest of the Sand Hills is dunal uplands where the water table is many meters below the surface.

It has long been assumed that the Sand Hills are a recharge zone for the underlying aquifer and that local precipitation more than accounts for the water usage of surface vegetation. This research measures how much water enters the Sand Hills ecosystem (via precipitation) and how much water leaves the land surface - the Sand Hills surface water balance. Research shows that Sand Hills surface water is lost primarily through evapotranspiration, or surface water evaporation and plant transpiration, with the relative size of each varying greatly depending on the time of year and other factors, such as drought. Research also shows that: 1) the most water is transferred to the atmosphere from wet meadows, followed by dry valleys and dunal uplands; 2) the close proximity to the aquifer acts as a buffer to both wet meadows and dry valleys, but not to dunal uplands; and 3) groundwater buffering is most affected by regional rather than local precipitation events. The long-term goal of this project is to study and better understand the relationship between water and the vegetative land cover (carbon).

Project Support n/a
Project Website
Report Billesbach_SandHills_Water.pdf
Current Status Continuing
Topic Sandhills Studies and Modeling
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Efting, Aris
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email aefting@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-3471
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=226
Project Information
Title Determining Toxic Algal Bloom Frequency in Nebraska Lakes
Description Research has been conducted in the Sandhills to determine whether or not there has been an increase in toxic algal blooms. Four different lakes were cored to identify the lakes' history of toxic algal blooms and determine whether there is an increase in toxin concentrations post 1950.
Project Support Layman Fund
Project Website
Report
Current Status Underway
Topic Sandhills Studies and Modeling
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Wedin, Dave
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email dwedin1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-9608
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=128
Project Information
Title Sand Hills Biocomplexity Project
Other(s) Vitaly Zlotnik, Department of Geosciences, vzlotnik1@unl.edu. 
Description

The Sand Hills, the largest sand dune area in the Western Hemisphere, is now stabalized by native grasses. This was not always the case. The Sand Hills have mobilized several times over the last 10,550 years. Major droughts destabilized significant portions of the Sand Hills as recently as 1000 years ago. The stability of the Sand Hills affects not only hundreds of cattle ranches, but also the recharge of the High Plains Aquifer. Of the total groundwater stored in this vast aquifer, 65% occurs in Nebraska and over half of that lies under the Sand Hills. The groundwater connection is obvious throughout the region. Due to the high water table, interdunal valleys in portions of the Sand Hills contain extensive complexes of lakes, wetlands, and naturally sub-irrigated wet meadows, which together cover over 10% of the landscape.

The Sand Hills Biocomplexity Project is a major federal project led by Professor Wedin. The project is aimed at testing whether:

  1. Evapotranspiration (ET) from wet valleys buffers the impacts of short-term drought on upland grasslands through local climate feedbacks. (resistance stability)
  2. When wetlands go dry, the combined effect of lost upland grass cover and lost wetland ET creates a desertification feedback that amplifies drought impacts.
  3. Since subregions of the Sand Hills differ in their extent of interdunal wetlands, subregions respond differently to paleo and historic droughts, thus enabling landowners to prepare for future droughts.
  4. Increased groundwater recharge when dunes are bare hastens the rise of groundwater levels, which, together with the rapid recovery of warm season grasses, restabilizes the dunes. (resilience stability)

The project's Grassland Destabilization Experiment (GDEX) is studying what happens to a Sand Hills dune when the vegetation dies. Researchers have created 10 circular plots at the Barta Brothers Ranch, each 120 meters in diameter, and used herbicide to kill all the vegetation on several of them. The plots are kept clear of vegetation, so that information on vegetation coverage, root mass, soil organic matter, and sand movement may be monitored and recorded to determine the stability of the plots. Results indicate that the Sand Hills may be more stable than previously thought; that is, ersosion is just starting to occur were vegetation was killed two years ago. Additional studies are needed to determine what happens when sand dunes become mobile.

As a part of this project, Professor Vitaly Zlotnik carries out research on groundwater recharge, hydraulic properties of the dune cover, and the climate change effects on groundwater recharge.

Project Support National Science Foundation
Project Website http://sandhills-biocomplexity.unl.edu/
Report
Current Status n/a
Topic Water Quality
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Gosselin, Dave
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email dgosselin2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-8919
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=42
Project Information
Title Geologic Rehabilitation of Public Water Supply Wells Having High Uranium
Description

The water delivered by Clarks' public water supply wells exceeded the 30 ppb maximum contaminant level (MCL) for uranium. This project tested whether well rehabilitation, hydrogeologic avoidance and well management could be used to reduce the concentration of uranium. Interval sampling (i.e., collecting water quality samples at different depths) indicated uranium concentrations were at or below the uranium MCL at two of three different depths. Based on this data and in consultation with Nebraska Health and Human Services personnel, it was decided that a variable frequency drive pump would be installed. The installation of this pump allows operators to vary the pumping rate, thereby, reducing stress on the aquifer. Because of the distinctly lower uranium concentrations near the bottom of the well, a packer system was installed to isolate the lower 2/3 of the well screen. This project concluded that uranium concentrations decreased with depth and uranium concentrations were influenced by the introduction of oxygen into the subsurface. Further study and potential experimentation with uranium concentrations and aeration in the test well and production well is suggested.

Recently, researchers have been examining the potential for microbial communities to affect the behavior of dissolved uranium at Clarks. The metabolism of these communities may facilitate the sorption and immobilization of dissolved uranium to available metals, such as iron or sulfide. Genomic analyses of water and biofilm samples taken in April 2007 from the Clarks public water supply well and monitoring well displayed presence of metal reducing and other unknown bacteria. Further genomic analyses will provide a more specific map of the diversity of these microbes in both Clarks wells, and should improve our understanding of how the presence of these communities affects the geochemistry observed in these wells.

Project Support Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services
Project Website http://snr.unl.edu/nebraskawaterquality/
Report
Current Status Completed
Topic Water Quality
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Kolok, Alan
Unit Biology, UNO
Email akolok@mail.unomaha.edu
Phone 402-554-3545
Web Page http://www.unomaha.edu/envirotox/whoiam.php
Project Information
Title The Watershed as A Conceptual Framework for the Study of Environmental and Human Health
Other(s) Cheryl L. Beseler, Department of Environmental, Agricultural and Occupational Health, UNMC, cbeseler@unmc.edu; Xun-Hong Chen, School of Natural Resources, xchen2@unl.edu; Patrick J. Shea, School of Natural Resources, pshea1@unl.edu 
Description

The watershed provides a physical basis for establishing linkages between aquatic contaminants, environmental health and human health. Current attempts to establish such linkages are limited by environmental and epidemiological constraints. Environmental limitations include difficulties in characterizing the temporal and spatial dynamics of agricultural runoff, in fully understanding the degradation and metabolism of these compounds in the environment, and in understanding complex mixtures. Epidemiological limitations include difficulties associated with the organization of risk factor data and uncertainty about which measurable endpoints are most appropriate for an agricultural setting. Nevertheless, the adoption of the watershed concept can alleviate some of these difficulties. From an environmental perspective, the watershed concept helps identify differences in land use and application of agrichemicals at a level of resolution relevant to human health outcomes. From an epidemiological perspective, the watershed concept places data into a construct with environmental relevance. This project uses the Elkhorn River watershed as a case study to show how the watershed can provide a conceptual framework for studies in environmental and human health.

Environmental sampling is necessary for evaluating exposure to hormone disrupting chemicals (HDCs); however, sampling is not systematic in time or space, nor does it represent the time frame necessary to adequately link it to human disease outcomes. Although data from municipal sources are available and reliable, countless private drinking water wells go untested and unmonitored. These wells may be in areas vulnerable to concentrated reservoirs of contaminants due to the soil type, infiltration rate, runoff potential, organic matter and erodibility coupled with land use in the region and the chemical properties of the contaminants introduced into the environment. The lack of a defined boundary and introduction of exposure heterogeneity is one of the primary reasons why associations to health outcomes cannot be shown in environmental epidemiological studies.

The use of the watershed provides a natural boundary and the potential within this boundary to obtain denominator data. Based on the characteristics of the watershed combined with sampling data, shared exposures can be identified and intermediate hypotheses tested using sentinel markers of exposure in fish and humans. Lastly, comparable groups identified in other watersheds with similar characteristics but different surrounding land uses can be used to replicate findings.

Project Support Department of Environmental, Agricultural and Occupational Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center
Project Website
Report Kolok_Watershed.pdf
Current Status Published in Environmental Health Insights 2009 3:1-10
Topic Water Quality
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Kolok, Alan
Unit Biology, UNO
Email akolok@mail.unomaha.edu
Phone 402-554-3545
Web Page http://www.unomaha.edu/envirotox/whoiam.php
Project Information
Title Occurrence and biological effect of exogenous steroids in the Elkhorn River, Nebraska
Other(s) Daniel D. Snow, School of Natural Resources, dsnow1@unl.edu; Satomi Kohno, Department of Zoology, University of Florida, kohno@ufl.edu; Marlo K. Sellin, Department of Biology, UNO, msellin@mail.unomaha.edu; Louis J. Guillette Jr., Department of Zoology, University of Florida, ljg@ufl.edu 
Description

Recent studies of surface waters in North America, Japan and Europe have reported the presence of steroidogenic agents as contaminants. This study had three objectives:

  1. to determine if steroidogenic compounds are present in the Elkhorn River,
  2. to determine if sediments collected from the Elkhorn River can act as a source of steroidogenic compounds to aquatic organisms, and
  3. to determine if site-specific biological effects are apparent in the hepatic gene expression of fathead minnows.

Evidence was obtained using three approaches:

  1. deployment of polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS),
  2. deployment of caged fathead minnows, and
  3. a laboratory experiment in which POCIS and fish were exposed to sediments from the deployment sites.

Deployment sites included: the Elkhorn River immediately downstream from a Nebraska wastewater treatment plant, two waterways (Fisher Creek and Sand Creek) likely to be impacted by runoff from cattle feeding operations, and a reference site unlikely to be impacted by waste water inputs. The POCIS extracts were analyzed for a number of natural steroids and metabolites, as well as four different synthetic steroids: ethinylestradiol, zearalonol, 17-trenbolone and melengestrol acetate. Estrogenic and androgenic metabolites, as well as progesterone and trace levels of melengestrol acetate were detected in POCIS deployed at each site. POCIS deployed in tanks containing field sediments from the four sites did not accumulate the synthetic steroids except for ethinylestradiol, which was detected in the aquarium containing sediments collected near the wastewater treatment plant. Fish deployed in Sand Creek and at the wastewater treatment plant experienced significantly elevated levels of gene expression for two genes (StAR and P450scc) relative to those deployed in Fisher Creek. Fish exposed to the sediments collected from Sand Creek had significantly higher levels of hepatic StAR and P450scc gene expression than did fish exposed to sediments from the two other field sites, as well as the no-sediment control tank.

In conclusion:

  1. detectable levels of steroidogenic compounds were detected in passive samplers deployed in the Elkhorn River,
  2. sediments do not appear to be a significant source for steroidogenic compounds, and
  3. site-specific differences were found in mRNA expression among the different treatment groups of fish; however, a functional explanation for these differences is not readily forthcoming.
Project Support Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, U.S. Geological Survey's Section 104b Program as administered by the UNL Water Center, US Environmental Protection Agency Greater Opportunities Fellowship, Dr. Daniel Villeneuve, US Environmental Protection Agency
Project Website
Report Kolok_Elkhorn.pdf
Current Status Published in Science of the Total Environment 2007 388:104-115
Topic Water Quality
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Shelton, David
Unit Biological Systems Engineering and Extension Agricultural Engineer
Email dshelton2@unl.edu
Phone 402-584-3849
Web Page http://bse.unl.edu/dshelton2
Project Information
Title Conservation Buffers to Enhance Water Quality
Description

Conservation buffers are strips or small areas of permanent vegetation that protect and enhance water quality in three ways: 1) sediment and other particulate-bound pollutants are trapped within the buffer; 2) runoff water, often containing soluble nutrients and pesticides, is reduced through increased infiltration in the buffer; and 3) agricultural practices are physically kept away from sensitive areas. When placed along the edges of rivers, streams, and other water bodies, these vegetated areas, or riparian buffers, provide a "buffer" between the water body and adjacent land - typically crop land.

Although farmers and landowners generally strive to be stewards of the land, installation of a buffer requires that land be removed from crop production. In the case of a riparian buffer, the land adjacent to the water body is often some of the most productive land, making producers even more reluctant to take this land out of production. Also, periodic maintenance to help assure buffer performance is an expense.

To help address these and other concerns, several buffer-related projects are being conducted at the University of Nebraska Northeast Research and Extension Center and Haskell Agricultural Laboratory (HAL). One of these is a major demonstration/research buffer at HAL. The overall objective of the HAL buffer site is to maintain a large-scale demonstration and research living laboratory for natural resource professionals, producers, landowners, students, and the general public featuring a spectrum of conventional and non-conventional plant materials and designs in a natural and working agricultural environment. This buffer consists of approximately 23 acres and is 75 feet wide along each side of the entire length (approximately one mile) of the stream channel through the center of the HAL site.

The HAL buffer consists of 7 separate "areas", each having a primary focus or emphasis, as well as a number of secondary purposes aimed at meeting project objectives. Briefly, these areas are:

  • Woody decorative florals, fruits, and hazelnuts as alternative plant materials, to evaluate the suitability and income-producing potential of specialty woody plant materials (willows, dogwoods, and others) in a conservation buffer.
  • Grasses, wildflowers, and other forbs, to demonstrate and evaluate stands of different plant materials that are currently used or that may be suitable for use in conservation buffers.
  • Grass species mixtures, to demonstrate and evaluate typically recommended grass mixtures.
  • Riparian forested buffer, to demonstrate forested buffer areas designed and planted according to both current and alternative standards and specifications.
  • Alternative methods of tree and shrub establishment, to demonstrate alternative planting and establishment techniques, particularly direct seeding.
  • Weed management, to investigate weed control methods initiated the year prior to and the year of buffer establishment, and in subsequent years.
  • Alternative buffer design, to investigate and demonstrate alternative planting techniques and/or plant materials that may help maintain and/or re-establish uniform flow conditions within a buffer, thus reducing maintenance required.
Project Support University of Nebraska Agricultural Research Division
Project Website
Report
Current Status Continuous
Topic Water Quality
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Spalding, Roy
Unit Agronomy and Horticulture
Email rspalding1@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-8214
Web Page http://agronomy.unl.edu/spalding
Project Information
Title Risk-Managed Approach for Routing Petroleum Pipelines: Keystone XL Pipeline, Nebraska
Other(s) Aaron Hirsh, Department of Civil Engineering, ajhirsh@huskers.unl.edu 
Description

TransCanada’s proposed international crude oil pipeline route over sensitive, relatively pristine, subirrigated land underlain by the Ogallala aquifer led to increased scrutiny and eventual rejection of the Keystone XL pipeline. Pipeline routing could be made much more acceptable by adopting risk-managed routes that lessen the potential to adversely impact high-quality groundwater and, should a release occur, decrease the longevity of hazardous groundwater contaminants. Threats to water quality are taken quite seriously in states like Nebraska where 85% of the population depend on groundwater for potable water.

The authors proposed a southeasterly route through Holt, Antelope and Pierce counties, to the existing north-south Keystone 1 pipeline, avoiding the Ogallala aquifer beneath the fragile and pristine Sandhills, sub-irrigated meadows and areas with very shallow water tables. The risk-managed route through these three counties is through overlying row-cropped land underlain by already contaminated Ogallala groundwater to the Keystone 1 corridor.

Since little is known about the potential movement of dilbit (diluted bitumen) to groundwater at release sites, the study states that one of the best ways to minimize risks from a potential spill is to carefully select a pipeline route with minimal environmental risk and reasonable length. There are so many variables including the chemical composition of the dilbit, ambient temperature, depth to groundwater, emergency cleanup practices and other factors, that predicting the exact mechanism of contaminant movement to the aquifer is complicated. Additionally, the existing nitrate contamination in Holt, Antelope and Pierce counties stretches for over 100 miles and 1 million acres. These leached soils enhance the degradation of hazardous petroleum compounds in groundwater.

Project Support Nebraska Ethanol Board and Hatch grant 21-6222-1055
Project Website
Report Risk_Managed_Petroleum_Pipeline.pdf
Current Status Completed
Pic 1 Project Image
Topic Wetlands
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Allen, Craig
Unit Nebraska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
Email callen3@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-0229
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=647
Project Information
Title Missouri River Mitigation: Implementation of Amphibian Monitoring and Adaptive Management for Wetland Restoration Evaluation
Other(s) Martin Simon, Benedictine College; Michelle Hellman, School of Natural Resources, michelle.hellman@huskers.unl.edu; Ashley Vanderham, School of Natural Resources, avanderham@huskers.unl.edu 
Description

Data are being collected to determine what constitutes a successful wetland restoration, given the desired goals of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Herpetofauna primarily amphibians are being used as indicators of wetland success. This will be accomplished by quantifying the occurrence and recruitment of amphibians at existing mitigation sites and formulating models of quality wetland restorations. These models will be used by managers in future restorations and for adaptive management approaches to the design of new wetland restorations. The study area is the Missouri River corridor of Iowa, Kansas, Missouri and Nebraska.

This project is a multi-institutional monitoring program that focuses on tightly linking monitoring with hypothesis testing in an adaptive framework. The design consists of frog call surveys to determine occupancy rates for a large number of wetlands on numerous restoration properties, coupled with intensive sampling of frogs, turtles and salamanders to assess abundance and recruitment on eight restored wetland complexes in four states. The focus areas for the Nebraska Coop Unit are three Missouri River wetland complexes located from Falls City to Omaha, Nebraska. Project collaborators at Benedictine College in Kansas are focusing on the Benedictine Wetlands in Kansas.

Click here to read a fact sheet on this project

Project Support United States Geological Survey, United States Army Corps of Engineers
Project Website http://snr.unl.edu/necoopunit/research.main.html#missouririvermitigation
Report
Current Status Underway
Topic Wildlife
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Pegg, Mark
Unit School of Natural Resources
Email mpegg2@unl.edu
Phone 402-472-6824
Web Page http://snr.unl.edu/aboutus/who/people/faculty-member.asp?pid=739
Project Information
Title Habitat Usage of Missouri River Paddlefish Project
Description Sediment from the Niobrara River has created a delta area near the headwaters of Lewis and Clark Lake, the reservoir formed by Gavins Point Dam on the Missouri River. This sediment aggregation has reduced reservoir volume and threatens to fill the reservoir; therefore, restoration of reservoir capacity has been proposed by means of high-velocity water releases from upstream mainstem dams. Biologists, however, have reported that this delta area may serve as spawning grounds for native fishes like paddlefish, and may provide suitable spawning habitat for federally endangered pallid sturgeon. This situation has created a unique paradox where information is needed to provide insight into fulfilling both the river management needs and biological needs in the Missouri River. This project will use paddlefish telemetry to study spawning success.

Click here to read Brenda Pracheil's dissertation on Paddlefish populations

Project Support Nebraska Environmental Trust
Project Website
Report Pracheil et al_Fisheries_2012.pdf
Current Status Completed
Topic Wildlife
Project's Primary Contact Information
Name Stansbury, John
Unit Civil Engineering, UNO
Email jstansbury2@unl.edu
Phone 402-554-3896
Web Page http://www.civil.unl.edu/faculty/John-Stansbury
Project Information
Title Multi-Criteria Assessment of Habitat Restoration for the Missouri River Project
Other(s) Istvan Bogardi (retired), ibogardi1@unl.edu 
Description

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) in cooperation with other agencies such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is currently planning, designing, and constructing projects designed to restore habitat in and along the Missouri River. The primary focus of the projects is restoration of habitat for three endangered or threatened species: pallid sturgeon, least tern, and piping plover. Management and restoration of the Missouri River is a complex endeavor that affects many people with many and often conflicting priorities. In addition, restoration of habitat is a complex process with many and often conflicting objectives. For example, habitat restoration activities for one species may interfere with habitat needs for another species. Finally, habitat restoration success is difficult to measure, in part because there is often a significant lag time between the restoration activity and the response by the target species. Therefore, a method is being developed, using multi-criteria assessment tools, to help the USACE and cooperators assess the status and the progress of the habitat restoration program.

The goal of this project is to develop a multi-criteria assessment tool that can be used to assess the overall status and progress of the habitat restoration efforts on the Missouri River. To achieve this goal, the first step will be to determine the requirements for habitat (e.g., water depths, velocities, bottom substrates, etc) for the endangered species. Then measurement criteria (i.e., what data will need to be collected to assess the availability of the required habitat) will be established. Finally, a multi-criteria assessment tool will be developed and used to integrate the conditions of the various measurement criteria (depths, velocities, etc.) to gain an understanding of the overall quality and quantity of habitat at different points in time.

Project Support U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Project Website
Report
Current Status Continuing
Location

Northeast WMA

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